How the breadwinning role and sex of employees influence beliefs about referent choice and job satisfaction

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282543
Title:
How the breadwinning role and sex of employees influence beliefs about referent choice and job satisfaction
Author:
Adair, Deborah Elaine, 1960-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research starts from the premise that women's entry into, and substantial representation in, the workforce has changed the nature of the relationship between family and work roles. Specifically, the purpose is to show that the roles people play in their families significantly affects their determination of job satisfaction. Equity theory and relative deprivation theory suggest that a pivotal factor in determining job satisfaction is the selection and use of a referent. In practice, however, the research on referent use in job satisfaction has not considered family role effects because job satisfaction research has focused almost exclusively on the work domain. This research seeks to expand upon this literature by hypothesizing that family role will influence the choice of the referent and will be a meaningful explanatory variable in job satisfaction models. Analysis of the survey results reveals basic support for the inclusion of family role in models of job satisfaction in four job satisfaction contexts. The family role variable of breadwinning status is positively related to job satisfaction and emerges as a better explanatory variable for job satisfaction responses than respondent sex. The effects of family role on referent choice, however, are not consistent or strong. Instead, only respondent-referent similarity was found to have a robust effect on referent choice. Other referent choice decisions were explored on a post-hoc basis. Overall, the results of this study indicate that breadwinning status is a statistically significant factor in job satisfaction decisions. The data are supportive of a model in which beliefs about the relationship between work and family role obligations mediate the effects of breadwinning status on job satisfaction. Given the exploratory nature of this study, further research is suggested to replicate and expand the major findings.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Business Administration, Management.; Psychology, Industrial.; Sociology, Individual and Family Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Industrial Management
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Shalley, Christina S.; Gutek, Barbara A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHow the breadwinning role and sex of employees influence beliefs about referent choice and job satisfactionen_US
dc.creatorAdair, Deborah Elaine, 1960-en_US
dc.contributor.authorAdair, Deborah Elaine, 1960-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research starts from the premise that women's entry into, and substantial representation in, the workforce has changed the nature of the relationship between family and work roles. Specifically, the purpose is to show that the roles people play in their families significantly affects their determination of job satisfaction. Equity theory and relative deprivation theory suggest that a pivotal factor in determining job satisfaction is the selection and use of a referent. In practice, however, the research on referent use in job satisfaction has not considered family role effects because job satisfaction research has focused almost exclusively on the work domain. This research seeks to expand upon this literature by hypothesizing that family role will influence the choice of the referent and will be a meaningful explanatory variable in job satisfaction models. Analysis of the survey results reveals basic support for the inclusion of family role in models of job satisfaction in four job satisfaction contexts. The family role variable of breadwinning status is positively related to job satisfaction and emerges as a better explanatory variable for job satisfaction responses than respondent sex. The effects of family role on referent choice, however, are not consistent or strong. Instead, only respondent-referent similarity was found to have a robust effect on referent choice. Other referent choice decisions were explored on a post-hoc basis. Overall, the results of this study indicate that breadwinning status is a statistically significant factor in job satisfaction decisions. The data are supportive of a model in which beliefs about the relationship between work and family role obligations mediate the effects of breadwinning status on job satisfaction. Given the exploratory nature of this study, further research is suggested to replicate and expand the major findings.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Management.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Industrial.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Individual and Family Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineIndustrial Managementen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorShalley, Christina S.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorGutek, Barbara A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9814444en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37744707en_US
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