Field-scale biofiltration: Performance evaluation and microbial analysis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282533
Title:
Field-scale biofiltration: Performance evaluation and microbial analysis
Author:
Jutras, Eileen Maura 1958
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Biofiltration has been shown to be an effective method for the remediation of volatile organic compounds (VOC's), particularly petroleum vapors extracted from the vadose zone. Many bacteria have the enzymatic pathways necessary for aerobic mineralization of VOC's to form cell biomass, carbon dioxide and water. Molecular methods such as nucleic acid hybridizations and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), are methods that can be applied to environmental samples to characterize bacterial community structure and function. The research presented here reports the use of a field-scale biofilter for the remediation of unleaded gasoline vapors extracted from the vadose zone. An evaluation of contaminant removal efficiency over a five month period showed that the biofilter removed 90% of total petroleum hydrocarbons and greater than 90% of the EPA priority pollutants benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene. The bacterial consortium in the biofilter medium readily adapted to increased loading rates, and variations in temperature and moisture. A combination of conventional cultural and molecular methods was used to track the bacterial populations over the course of the experiment. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of the small ribosomal subunit DNA sequence was used for identification of bacterial isolates and the design of DNA hybridization probes. Hybridization of these probes to community DNA samples taken from the biofilter over time revealed changes in specific bacterial populations as bioremediation occurred. Specifically, bacteria that could use gasoline, toluene, ethylbenzene or xylene were prevalent throughout the biofilter. Bacterial populations that could degrade xylene gradually increased over time, while overall total population size was the similar in the background sample and at the end of the study.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Microbiology.; Environmental Sciences.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Soil, Water and Environmental Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pepper, Ian L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleField-scale biofiltration: Performance evaluation and microbial analysisen_US
dc.creatorJutras, Eileen Maura 1958en_US
dc.contributor.authorJutras, Eileen Maura 1958en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBiofiltration has been shown to be an effective method for the remediation of volatile organic compounds (VOC's), particularly petroleum vapors extracted from the vadose zone. Many bacteria have the enzymatic pathways necessary for aerobic mineralization of VOC's to form cell biomass, carbon dioxide and water. Molecular methods such as nucleic acid hybridizations and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), are methods that can be applied to environmental samples to characterize bacterial community structure and function. The research presented here reports the use of a field-scale biofilter for the remediation of unleaded gasoline vapors extracted from the vadose zone. An evaluation of contaminant removal efficiency over a five month period showed that the biofilter removed 90% of total petroleum hydrocarbons and greater than 90% of the EPA priority pollutants benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene. The bacterial consortium in the biofilter medium readily adapted to increased loading rates, and variations in temperature and moisture. A combination of conventional cultural and molecular methods was used to track the bacterial populations over the course of the experiment. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of the small ribosomal subunit DNA sequence was used for identification of bacterial isolates and the design of DNA hybridization probes. Hybridization of these probes to community DNA samples taken from the biofilter over time revealed changes in specific bacterial populations as bioremediation occurred. Specifically, bacteria that could use gasoline, toluene, ethylbenzene or xylene were prevalent throughout the biofilter. Bacterial populations that could degrade xylene gradually increased over time, while overall total population size was the similar in the background sample and at the end of the study.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Microbiology.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water and Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPepper, Ian L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9814426en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37744185en_US
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