Developments in atomic analysis and imaging utilizing scientific charge-transfer devices: Axial viewing of the inductively coupled plasma, advanced hollow cathode designs, and latent fingerprint imaging

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282524
Title:
Developments in atomic analysis and imaging utilizing scientific charge-transfer devices: Axial viewing of the inductively coupled plasma, advanced hollow cathode designs, and latent fingerprint imaging
Author:
Radspinner, David Andrew, 1965-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This document describes the development of spectroscopic techniques which benefit from the use of charge-transfer devices. Both charge-coupled devices (CCD's) and charge-injection devices (CID's) are used in the techniques presented here such as atomic emission spectroscopy and latent fingerprint imaging. The use of a CID echelle system for axial viewing of the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) demonstrates the enhancement in sensitivity that can be obtained over tangential viewing. More importantly though, are the advantages afforded by simultaneous multi-element detection. Axial viewing of the ICP has shown to not only improve upon the detection limits of several metals by, in some cases, a half order of magnitude, but also to increase the amount of light collected and thus reduce the time of analysis. Along with this, the effect of interferences upon the detection of various metals is, at worst, equivalent to that of an ICP with tangential viewing. Further enhancement of sensitivity in atomic analysis can be achieved by atomic fluorescence with an ICP. Although in the past, hollow cathode lamps have proven to be insufficient, advanced designs of hollow cathode lamps presented here have demonstrated an increase in the intensity of lines of copper best suited for use in ICP atomic fluorescence. Lastly, a latent fingerprint has been imaged with the use of a scientific CCD and a flashlight where in the past such a technique was accomplished with high power lasers. By using a CCD, the immediate digitization of information combined with the sensitivity and image processing capabilities offer a portable means by which to image latent fingerprints on poor surfaces.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Chemistry, Analytical.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Chemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Denton, M. Bonner

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDevelopments in atomic analysis and imaging utilizing scientific charge-transfer devices: Axial viewing of the inductively coupled plasma, advanced hollow cathode designs, and latent fingerprint imagingen_US
dc.creatorRadspinner, David Andrew, 1965-en_US
dc.contributor.authorRadspinner, David Andrew, 1965-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis document describes the development of spectroscopic techniques which benefit from the use of charge-transfer devices. Both charge-coupled devices (CCD's) and charge-injection devices (CID's) are used in the techniques presented here such as atomic emission spectroscopy and latent fingerprint imaging. The use of a CID echelle system for axial viewing of the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) demonstrates the enhancement in sensitivity that can be obtained over tangential viewing. More importantly though, are the advantages afforded by simultaneous multi-element detection. Axial viewing of the ICP has shown to not only improve upon the detection limits of several metals by, in some cases, a half order of magnitude, but also to increase the amount of light collected and thus reduce the time of analysis. Along with this, the effect of interferences upon the detection of various metals is, at worst, equivalent to that of an ICP with tangential viewing. Further enhancement of sensitivity in atomic analysis can be achieved by atomic fluorescence with an ICP. Although in the past, hollow cathode lamps have proven to be insufficient, advanced designs of hollow cathode lamps presented here have demonstrated an increase in the intensity of lines of copper best suited for use in ICP atomic fluorescence. Lastly, a latent fingerprint has been imaged with the use of a scientific CCD and a flashlight where in the past such a technique was accomplished with high power lasers. By using a CCD, the immediate digitization of information combined with the sensitivity and image processing capabilities offer a portable means by which to image latent fingerprints on poor surfaces.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectChemistry, Analytical.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDenton, M. Bonneren_US
dc.identifier.proquest9814416en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37742681en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.