Atmospheric sounding from satellite solar occultation refraction measurements

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282495
Title:
Atmospheric sounding from satellite solar occultation refraction measurements
Author:
Ward, Dale Michael, 1963-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Measurements of the refractive bending of solar radiation passing through the limb of the Earth's atmosphere can be utilized to recover vertical profiles of density and temperature. These parameters obtained using the technique of solar refractive sounding could be used to improve satellite solar occultation trace species retrievals and to monitor potential trends in upper atmospheric temperatures. The solar refractive sounding method is described in detail and applied to data available from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II). The meteorological profiles derived from the SAGE II data are not consistently accurate enough for general use due to poor vertical sampling and measurement uncertainties. However, the qualitatively decent results provide optimism for future development and implementation of solar occultation refractive sounders. Better techniques for measuring solar refraction and the potential improvements in the retrievals are also discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Physics, Atmospheric Science.; Remote Sensing.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Atmospheric Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Herman, Benjamin M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAtmospheric sounding from satellite solar occultation refraction measurementsen_US
dc.creatorWard, Dale Michael, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorWard, Dale Michael, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractMeasurements of the refractive bending of solar radiation passing through the limb of the Earth's atmosphere can be utilized to recover vertical profiles of density and temperature. These parameters obtained using the technique of solar refractive sounding could be used to improve satellite solar occultation trace species retrievals and to monitor potential trends in upper atmospheric temperatures. The solar refractive sounding method is described in detail and applied to data available from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II). The meteorological profiles derived from the SAGE II data are not consistently accurate enough for general use due to poor vertical sampling and measurement uncertainties. However, the qualitatively decent results provide optimism for future development and implementation of solar occultation refractive sounders. Better techniques for measuring solar refraction and the potential improvements in the retrievals are also discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Atmospheric Science.en_US
dc.subjectRemote Sensing.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAtmospheric Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHerman, Benjamin M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9814377en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37741810en_US
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