Social class reproduction: A case study at a large public university

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282493
Title:
Social class reproduction: A case study at a large public university
Author:
Sanders, Samson Emery
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this study, I investigated a university as an identity formation site. In particular, I analyzed the formation of social class identity and its relationship to social class reproduction. Social class reproduction theory, with identity formation and retention theories, were utilized to help explain the findings. The primary source of data for this qualitative study consisted of semi-structured interviews. In addition, I employed surveys and observational data collection techniques. The sample consisted of a group of 12 students from an upper-middle class background and 14 students from a lower-middle class background attending the same university. Data primarily consisted of the students' perceptions of their experiences during high school and while they were attending the university. The relative perceptions, expectations, and aspirations of the students' college experiences were discussed in light of social class reproduction theory. I found relatively few white male students from lower-middle class attending the university. The aspirations and expectations of the upper-middle class students were much higher than those of the lower-middle class students, even though the grade point average of the two groups was the same. Evidence suggested social class standing prior to enrollment, as well as experiences at the university, contributed to social class identity formation, aspirations, expectations, and potential professional outcomes after graduation. Old theories were challenged and new theories were proposed to inform the relationship between identity formation, aspirations, and outcomes in the university setting.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Sociology of.; Psychology, Developmental.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Woodard, Dudley B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSocial class reproduction: A case study at a large public universityen_US
dc.creatorSanders, Samson Emeryen_US
dc.contributor.authorSanders, Samson Emeryen_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this study, I investigated a university as an identity formation site. In particular, I analyzed the formation of social class identity and its relationship to social class reproduction. Social class reproduction theory, with identity formation and retention theories, were utilized to help explain the findings. The primary source of data for this qualitative study consisted of semi-structured interviews. In addition, I employed surveys and observational data collection techniques. The sample consisted of a group of 12 students from an upper-middle class background and 14 students from a lower-middle class background attending the same university. Data primarily consisted of the students' perceptions of their experiences during high school and while they were attending the university. The relative perceptions, expectations, and aspirations of the students' college experiences were discussed in light of social class reproduction theory. I found relatively few white male students from lower-middle class attending the university. The aspirations and expectations of the upper-middle class students were much higher than those of the lower-middle class students, even though the grade point average of the two groups was the same. Evidence suggested social class standing prior to enrollment, as well as experiences at the university, contributed to social class identity formation, aspirations, expectations, and potential professional outcomes after graduation. Old theories were challenged and new theories were proposed to inform the relationship between identity formation, aspirations, and outcomes in the university setting.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Sociology of.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWoodard, Dudley B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9814374en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37741718en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.