Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282481
Title:
LABOR MARKET EFFECTS ON ENROLLMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION
Author:
Rusk, James Jarrett, 1934-
Issue Date:
1980
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The effects of economic conditions upon higher education enrollments between 1966 and 1978 are specified nationally, regionally, and for The University of Arizona. The study indicates that since 1973, about the time when studies began to report on the declining value of a college education, potential students became much more sensitive to the opportunity costs of college attendance. As job opportunities increased, foregone earnings grew correspondingly, and enrollments decreased. Economic reversals were accompanied by enrollment increases. The study provides a perspective for evaluating the relationship between higher education and the economy. As such, it has implications for institutional planning to help set tuition levels, to make enrollment projections, or to aid decisions regarding student aid, demand for faculty and staff, and fund-raising goals.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Higher -- Economic aspects -- United States.; Labor supply -- United States.; United States -- Economic conditions -- 1961-1971.; United States -- Economic conditions -- 1971-1981.
Degree Name:
Educat.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Leslie, Larry L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleLABOR MARKET EFFECTS ON ENROLLMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATIONen_US
dc.creatorRusk, James Jarrett, 1934-en_US
dc.contributor.authorRusk, James Jarrett, 1934-en_US
dc.date.issued1980en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe effects of economic conditions upon higher education enrollments between 1966 and 1978 are specified nationally, regionally, and for The University of Arizona. The study indicates that since 1973, about the time when studies began to report on the declining value of a college education, potential students became much more sensitive to the opportunity costs of college attendance. As job opportunities increased, foregone earnings grew correspondingly, and enrollments decreased. Economic reversals were accompanied by enrollment increases. The study provides a perspective for evaluating the relationship between higher education and the economy. As such, it has implications for institutional planning to help set tuition levels, to make enrollment projections, or to aid decisions regarding student aid, demand for faculty and staff, and fund-raising goals.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher -- Economic aspects -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectLabor supply -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectUnited States -- Economic conditions -- 1961-1971.en_US
dc.subjectUnited States -- Economic conditions -- 1971-1981.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEducat.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLeslie, Larry L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8025221en_US
dc.identifier.oclc7426183en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b1338241xen_US
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