Narratives of Navajo-ness: An ideological analysis of Navajo language shift

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282478
Title:
Narratives of Navajo-ness: An ideological analysis of Navajo language shift
Author:
House, Deborah Elizabeth, 1950-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Despite the many factors that contribute to the maintenance of their language, the Navajo people are experiencing a rapid shift from Navajo to English. My research points to an ideological component in this shift, defining ideology as a self-interested pattern of thoughts and beliefs about the hierarchical relationship with others that is held by people individually or as members of a specific group. This project concludes that the diverse and contradictory ideologies held by Navajo people about their unequal relationship to the dominant American society have led to language (and cultural) choices and behaviors that have contributed to the current alarming language situation and that will, if unchecked, result in further erosion of the language. These ideologies are organized around a powerful oppositional dichotomy that represents the Navajo and the United States as essentialized opposites, with the Navajo occupying the positive end of the spectrum and the United States the negative end. This dichotomy shapes and is shaped by the content of Navajo counter-hegemonic discourse. The pervasive existence and consequences of the friction between these ideological positions are further substantiated through an analysis of the content and contexts of language use by Navajos in a contemporary Navajo school setting.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Bilingual and Multicultural.; Language, Linguistics.; Anthropology, Cultural.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Philips, Susan U.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleNarratives of Navajo-ness: An ideological analysis of Navajo language shiften_US
dc.creatorHouse, Deborah Elizabeth, 1950-en_US
dc.contributor.authorHouse, Deborah Elizabeth, 1950-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDespite the many factors that contribute to the maintenance of their language, the Navajo people are experiencing a rapid shift from Navajo to English. My research points to an ideological component in this shift, defining ideology as a self-interested pattern of thoughts and beliefs about the hierarchical relationship with others that is held by people individually or as members of a specific group. This project concludes that the diverse and contradictory ideologies held by Navajo people about their unequal relationship to the dominant American society have led to language (and cultural) choices and behaviors that have contributed to the current alarming language situation and that will, if unchecked, result in further erosion of the language. These ideologies are organized around a powerful oppositional dichotomy that represents the Navajo and the United States as essentialized opposites, with the Navajo occupying the positive end of the spectrum and the United States the negative end. This dichotomy shapes and is shaped by the content of Navajo counter-hegemonic discourse. The pervasive existence and consequences of the friction between these ideological positions are further substantiated through an analysis of the content and contexts of language use by Navajos in a contemporary Navajo school setting.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Bilingual and Multicultural.en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Linguistics.en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPhilips, Susan U.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9806855en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37563865en_US
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