Local wall shear stress and interface behavior of adiabatic air-water flows in rectangular ducts

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282445
Title:
Local wall shear stress and interface behavior of adiabatic air-water flows in rectangular ducts
Author:
Gottmann, Matthias, 1964-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
An experiment was designed and built to study vertical annular air-water flows in a channel with a rectangular cross section with no heat transfer. Flush-wire electrical conductivity probes were theoretically analyzed to demonstrate their potential to accurately measure liquid film thickness in the experiment with high temporal and spatial resolution. Flush-wire probes were then successfully implemented and film thickness measurements obtained. From theoretical analysis, the suitability of micromachined hot film and floating element wall shear stress sensors for measurements of wall shear stress in the annular flow was investigated. A microfabricated hot film wall shear stress sensor was subsequently packaged and installed in the experiment, where it provided wall shear stress measurements with high temporal and spatial resolution. After the implementation of these new measurement techniques, a large suite of test cases was run and data for film thickness and wall shear stress acquired. A statistical analysis of the film thickness data indicates the existence of two distinct wave regimes, ripple waves and disturbance waves, within the annular flow regime. Spectral decomposition of film thickness and wall shear stress data demonstrates the existence of dominant frequencies in the wave spectrum and an exponential decay of wave amplitudes at high frequencies indicative of a force balance between capillary and momentum forces. Wave velocities were determined from cross correlations which again provided evidence of different types of waves each with different wave velocities and spatial extensions. A semi-analytical model for wave velocities as a function of superficial Reynolds numbers was validated and improved. The improved model gives an accurate prediction for wave velocities and is based on physical arguments representing the appropriate length scales in annular flow. The experimental results and data analysis provide a new perspective of annular two-phase flows in a channel with a rectangular cross section.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Engineering, Aerospace.; Engineering, Mechanical.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sridhar, K. R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleLocal wall shear stress and interface behavior of adiabatic air-water flows in rectangular ductsen_US
dc.creatorGottmann, Matthias, 1964-en_US
dc.contributor.authorGottmann, Matthias, 1964-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAn experiment was designed and built to study vertical annular air-water flows in a channel with a rectangular cross section with no heat transfer. Flush-wire electrical conductivity probes were theoretically analyzed to demonstrate their potential to accurately measure liquid film thickness in the experiment with high temporal and spatial resolution. Flush-wire probes were then successfully implemented and film thickness measurements obtained. From theoretical analysis, the suitability of micromachined hot film and floating element wall shear stress sensors for measurements of wall shear stress in the annular flow was investigated. A microfabricated hot film wall shear stress sensor was subsequently packaged and installed in the experiment, where it provided wall shear stress measurements with high temporal and spatial resolution. After the implementation of these new measurement techniques, a large suite of test cases was run and data for film thickness and wall shear stress acquired. A statistical analysis of the film thickness data indicates the existence of two distinct wave regimes, ripple waves and disturbance waves, within the annular flow regime. Spectral decomposition of film thickness and wall shear stress data demonstrates the existence of dominant frequencies in the wave spectrum and an exponential decay of wave amplitudes at high frequencies indicative of a force balance between capillary and momentum forces. Wave velocities were determined from cross correlations which again provided evidence of different types of waves each with different wave velocities and spatial extensions. A semi-analytical model for wave velocities as a function of superficial Reynolds numbers was validated and improved. The improved model gives an accurate prediction for wave velocities and is based on physical arguments representing the appropriate length scales in annular flow. The experimental results and data analysis provide a new perspective of annular two-phase flows in a channel with a rectangular cross section.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Aerospace.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Mechanical.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAerospace and Mechanical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSridhar, K. R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9806837en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37557130en_US
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