Calibration of psychological measures: An illustration of three quantitative methods

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282437
Title:
Calibration of psychological measures: An illustration of three quantitative methods
Author:
McKnight, Patrick Everett, 1966-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The scores or metrics from psychological measures are rarely interpretable. Uninterpretable metrics result in poorly understood psychological research findings. In response to this problem, several methods are proposed that render metrics more meaningful. The methods employed are calibration procedures. Three calibration procedures are illustrated that prove to be extremely powerful in making the metrics of two related measures more understandable. Establishing the behavioral implications of the scores, computing just noticeable differences, and calibrating between measures are the three procedures described and illustrated. For the purposes of illustration, two measures of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are used in the calibration procedures. These two measures are often used interchangeably without regard to their relationship with one another. The three procedures and the results of each are discussed in detail.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Developmental.; Psychology, Clinical.; Psychology, Psychometrics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sechrest, Lee

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCalibration of psychological measures: An illustration of three quantitative methodsen_US
dc.creatorMcKnight, Patrick Everett, 1966-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcKnight, Patrick Everett, 1966-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe scores or metrics from psychological measures are rarely interpretable. Uninterpretable metrics result in poorly understood psychological research findings. In response to this problem, several methods are proposed that render metrics more meaningful. The methods employed are calibration procedures. Three calibration procedures are illustrated that prove to be extremely powerful in making the metrics of two related measures more understandable. Establishing the behavioral implications of the scores, computing just noticeable differences, and calibrating between measures are the three procedures described and illustrated. For the purposes of illustration, two measures of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are used in the calibration procedures. These two measures are often used interchangeably without regard to their relationship with one another. The three procedures and the results of each are discussed in detail.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Psychometrics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSechrest, Leeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9806826en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37555856en_US
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