INDIVIDUAL ORAL TESTING AS A METHOD FOR REDUCTION OF TEST ANXIETY AND EXPRESSION OF CONTENT COMPREHENSION

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282427
Title:
INDIVIDUAL ORAL TESTING AS A METHOD FOR REDUCTION OF TEST ANXIETY AND EXPRESSION OF CONTENT COMPREHENSION
Author:
Cornelius, Marion Edna
Issue Date:
1980
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research dealt with the use of oral individual testing as a teaching technique, as well as an evaluative tool. The research was also concerned with students' self-concept, nervous anxiety level, and attitude toward testing. The purpose was to increase student comprehension of content material, and through practice and feedback, raise students' self-concept and reduce his/her nervous anxiety. The four research hypotheses were: (1) there will be a difference in ability to take and pass tests and improve test scores; (2) there will be a difference in student attitude toward oral and written testing; (3) there will be a difference in student self-concept; and (4) there will be a difference in nervous anxiety level. All of these differences were shown over a two-semester span of the experiment. The sample consisted of 33 anatomy-physiology students enrolled in two sections taught by the researcher. Students within each of the experimental classes were assigned to two groups of equal numbers of students which alternated between written and oral testing throughout a two-semester sequence. Instruments used in this study included teacher constructed tests on the human anatomical and physiological systems. The format was identical for both oral and written testing on a particular system. Data were gathered on all test scores: medians, modes, means, and standard deviations were computed. Statistical data included a two-way analysis of variance, tukey HSD and Scheffe Post Hoc Tests, Reliability and Internal Consistency computer checks on teacher made tests, Likert attitudinal scales, and Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis. A researcher-student developed five-point Likert was used to measure student attitude toward oral and written tests. The Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis was used to gather pre and post data on self-concept and nervous anxiety levels. Individual student test score profiles showed change in ability to take and pass tests, as well as an improvement trend over the two-semester sequence. These were graphed by individual, and by class, for comparison. Statistical analysis showed significant differences in oral and written test scores, so post hoc tests were used to detect these differences. The analysis indicated students were able to improve test taking ability enough to change ranks within the class itself. Students consistently scored higher on oral ests than on written tests of identical format. Reliability and internal consistency checks on teacher made tests showed .95 and .97 consistency on oral and written tests, respectively. Likert scales showed data strongly supporting a student preference for oral testing. This preference included the ability to better tell what they knew; the ability to verbalize, hear and elaborate. Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis, pre and post testing, showed a significant rise in self-concept and a decrease in nervous anxiety level over the research time span. Interpretation of the data led to the rejection of the four null hypotheses and to the acceptance of the four research or alternative hypotheses. Repetition of this research using larger numbers of students in different subjects, and by different teachers in a variety of grade levels, would increase the viability of these data and challenge others to try oral individual testing as an alternative method of testing. This, then, would serve as a learning tool for the student as well as an evaluative tool for the teacher.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Test anxiety.; Oral examinations.; Examinations.
Degree Name:
Educat.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Secondary Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Clark, Donald C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleINDIVIDUAL ORAL TESTING AS A METHOD FOR REDUCTION OF TEST ANXIETY AND EXPRESSION OF CONTENT COMPREHENSIONen_US
dc.creatorCornelius, Marion Ednaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCornelius, Marion Ednaen_US
dc.date.issued1980en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research dealt with the use of oral individual testing as a teaching technique, as well as an evaluative tool. The research was also concerned with students' self-concept, nervous anxiety level, and attitude toward testing. The purpose was to increase student comprehension of content material, and through practice and feedback, raise students' self-concept and reduce his/her nervous anxiety. The four research hypotheses were: (1) there will be a difference in ability to take and pass tests and improve test scores; (2) there will be a difference in student attitude toward oral and written testing; (3) there will be a difference in student self-concept; and (4) there will be a difference in nervous anxiety level. All of these differences were shown over a two-semester span of the experiment. The sample consisted of 33 anatomy-physiology students enrolled in two sections taught by the researcher. Students within each of the experimental classes were assigned to two groups of equal numbers of students which alternated between written and oral testing throughout a two-semester sequence. Instruments used in this study included teacher constructed tests on the human anatomical and physiological systems. The format was identical for both oral and written testing on a particular system. Data were gathered on all test scores: medians, modes, means, and standard deviations were computed. Statistical data included a two-way analysis of variance, tukey HSD and Scheffe Post Hoc Tests, Reliability and Internal Consistency computer checks on teacher made tests, Likert attitudinal scales, and Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis. A researcher-student developed five-point Likert was used to measure student attitude toward oral and written tests. The Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis was used to gather pre and post data on self-concept and nervous anxiety levels. Individual student test score profiles showed change in ability to take and pass tests, as well as an improvement trend over the two-semester sequence. These were graphed by individual, and by class, for comparison. Statistical analysis showed significant differences in oral and written test scores, so post hoc tests were used to detect these differences. The analysis indicated students were able to improve test taking ability enough to change ranks within the class itself. Students consistently scored higher on oral ests than on written tests of identical format. Reliability and internal consistency checks on teacher made tests showed .95 and .97 consistency on oral and written tests, respectively. Likert scales showed data strongly supporting a student preference for oral testing. This preference included the ability to better tell what they knew; the ability to verbalize, hear and elaborate. Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis, pre and post testing, showed a significant rise in self-concept and a decrease in nervous anxiety level over the research time span. Interpretation of the data led to the rejection of the four null hypotheses and to the acceptance of the four research or alternative hypotheses. Repetition of this research using larger numbers of students in different subjects, and by different teachers in a variety of grade levels, would increase the viability of these data and challenge others to try oral individual testing as an alternative method of testing. This, then, would serve as a learning tool for the student as well as an evaluative tool for the teacher.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectTest anxiety.en_US
dc.subjectOral examinations.en_US
dc.subjectExaminations.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEducat.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecondary Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorClark, Donald C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8022836en_US
dc.identifier.oclc7414123en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b13379331en_US
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