Consonant duration and stress effects on the P-centers of English disyllables

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282415
Title:
Consonant duration and stress effects on the P-centers of English disyllables
Author:
Perez, Patricia Elizabeth, 1967-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Perceptual Centers (P-centers) refer to that phenomenon in a word that must be regularly spaced in time with respect to other P-centers in a sequence of words in order for the sequence to sound isochronous (Morton, Marcus, and Frankish, 1976). The P-centers of monosyllables have been found to be affected by the phonetic makeup of the syllable itself (Marcus, 1981; Fowler and Tassinary, 1981; Cooper, Whalen, and Fowler, 1986). In general, the longer a particular segment within a syllable (initial consonant, vowel, or final consonant), the later the syllable's P-center. This P-center is equidistant from the surrounding P-centers of other words. For example, if words are set in time to a metronome, their P-centers would align with the metronome beat since the beats are equidistant from each other. This thesis examines what determines the P-center locations within disyllabic English words (American dialect). Consonant lengths and stress patterns (foot type) are evaluated for their effects on the words' P-centers in a series of six production experiments. The results indicate that, like monosyllables, consonant length has a major effect on the location of disyllabic words' P-centers. And, initial consonants have a greater effect on their words' P-centers than either medial or final consonants. This finding supports Morishima's (1994) Onset-Tail model that was developed for Japanese disyllables. In addition to demonstrating the consonant length P-center effect in English disyllables, this thesis will also show that the disyllable's foot type affects its P-center. The interword intervals preceding trochees will be shown to be longer than those preceding iambs (a P-center effect). Therefore, the overall results of this thesis suggest that the P-centers of disyllables are affected by both their prosodic structure and their individual consonant lengths. The implications of this joint effect on words' P-centers will then be considered in light of the isochrony, timing, and slot literatures.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Language, Linguistics.; Psychology, Experimental.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Linguistics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hammond, Michael T.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleConsonant duration and stress effects on the P-centers of English disyllablesen_US
dc.creatorPerez, Patricia Elizabeth, 1967-en_US
dc.contributor.authorPerez, Patricia Elizabeth, 1967-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPerceptual Centers (P-centers) refer to that phenomenon in a word that must be regularly spaced in time with respect to other P-centers in a sequence of words in order for the sequence to sound isochronous (Morton, Marcus, and Frankish, 1976). The P-centers of monosyllables have been found to be affected by the phonetic makeup of the syllable itself (Marcus, 1981; Fowler and Tassinary, 1981; Cooper, Whalen, and Fowler, 1986). In general, the longer a particular segment within a syllable (initial consonant, vowel, or final consonant), the later the syllable's P-center. This P-center is equidistant from the surrounding P-centers of other words. For example, if words are set in time to a metronome, their P-centers would align with the metronome beat since the beats are equidistant from each other. This thesis examines what determines the P-center locations within disyllabic English words (American dialect). Consonant lengths and stress patterns (foot type) are evaluated for their effects on the words' P-centers in a series of six production experiments. The results indicate that, like monosyllables, consonant length has a major effect on the location of disyllabic words' P-centers. And, initial consonants have a greater effect on their words' P-centers than either medial or final consonants. This finding supports Morishima's (1994) Onset-Tail model that was developed for Japanese disyllables. In addition to demonstrating the consonant length P-center effect in English disyllables, this thesis will also show that the disyllable's foot type affects its P-center. The interword intervals preceding trochees will be shown to be longer than those preceding iambs (a P-center effect). Therefore, the overall results of this thesis suggest that the P-centers of disyllables are affected by both their prosodic structure and their individual consonant lengths. The implications of this joint effect on words' P-centers will then be considered in light of the isochrony, timing, and slot literatures.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Linguistics.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Experimental.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLinguisticsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHammond, Michael T.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9806798en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3754133xen_US
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