Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282408
Title:
Molecular systematics of the Simuliidae (Diptera: Culicomorpha)
Author:
Moulton, John Kevin, 1966-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Relationships within Simuliidae, or black flies, are inferred from molecular sequences from four nuclear loci -the large ribosomal subunit (28S rDNA), elongation factor one alpha (EF-1α), dopa decarboxylase (DDC), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) - and two mitochondrial loci - the small ribosomal subunit (12S rDNA) and subunit two of NADH dehydrogenase (ND2). Analyses of all genes provide varying degrees of support for subfamily and tribal limits within Simuliidae that are completely concordant with those inferred from the most intensive analysis of morphological data. Additionally, 28S and PEPCK suggest thaumaleids are more closely related to simuliids than are chironomids. Relationships within Simuliidae below the level of tribe were inferred from independent and simultaneous analyses of these data. Phylogenetic trees thought to represent best estimates of simuliid relationships were used to trace the evolution of several morphological characters and of natural partitions of these sequences, particularly codon positions in the four protein coding genes. The rather poor performance of these genes at intermediate taxonomic depths within Simuliidae is hypothesized to be the result of explosive diversification, properties of these genes, or a combination of the two. Potential hypotheses for the rather poor performance of these genes are proposed, and two types of genes hypothesized to be more informative in cases of explosive radiation are described.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Molecular.; Biology, Entomology.; Biology, Zoology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Entomology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Maddison, David R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMolecular systematics of the Simuliidae (Diptera: Culicomorpha)en_US
dc.creatorMoulton, John Kevin, 1966-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMoulton, John Kevin, 1966-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRelationships within Simuliidae, or black flies, are inferred from molecular sequences from four nuclear loci -the large ribosomal subunit (28S rDNA), elongation factor one alpha (EF-1α), dopa decarboxylase (DDC), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) - and two mitochondrial loci - the small ribosomal subunit (12S rDNA) and subunit two of NADH dehydrogenase (ND2). Analyses of all genes provide varying degrees of support for subfamily and tribal limits within Simuliidae that are completely concordant with those inferred from the most intensive analysis of morphological data. Additionally, 28S and PEPCK suggest thaumaleids are more closely related to simuliids than are chironomids. Relationships within Simuliidae below the level of tribe were inferred from independent and simultaneous analyses of these data. Phylogenetic trees thought to represent best estimates of simuliid relationships were used to trace the evolution of several morphological characters and of natural partitions of these sequences, particularly codon positions in the four protein coding genes. The rather poor performance of these genes at intermediate taxonomic depths within Simuliidae is hypothesized to be the result of explosive diversification, properties of these genes, or a combination of the two. Potential hypotheses for the rather poor performance of these genes are proposed, and two types of genes hypothesized to be more informative in cases of explosive radiation are described.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Molecular.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Entomology.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Zoology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEntomologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMaddison, David R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9806786en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37531359en_US
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