Exploiting broadband seismograms and the mechanism of deep-focus earthquakes

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282397
Title:
Exploiting broadband seismograms and the mechanism of deep-focus earthquakes
Author:
Jiao, Wenjie, 1963-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Modern broadband seismic instrumentation has provided enormous opportunities to retrieve the information in almost any frequency band of seismic interest. In this thesis, we have investigated the long period responses of the broadband seismometers and the problem of recovering actual groundmotion. For the first time, we recovered the static offset for an earthquake from dynamic seismograms. The very long period waves of near- and intermediate-field term from 1994 large Bolivian deep earthquake (depth = 630km, MW and 1997 large Argentina deep earthquake (depth = 285km, MW are successfully recovered from the portable broadband recordings by BANJO and APVC networks. These waves provide another dynamic window into the seismic source process and may provide unique information to help constrain the source dynamics of deep earthquakes in the future. We have developed a new method to locate global explosion events based on broadband waveform stacking and simulated annealing. This method utilizes the information provided by the full broadband waveforms. Instead of "picking times", the character of the wavelet is used for locating events. The application of this methodology to a Lop Nor nuclear explosion is very successful, and suggests a procedure for automatic monitoring. We have discussed the problem of deep earthquakes from the viewpoint of rock mechanics and seismology. The rupture propagation of deep earthquakes requires a slip-weakening process unlike that for shallow events. However, this process is not necessarily the same as the process which triggers the rupture. Partial melting due to stress release is developed to account for the slip-weakening process in the deep earthquake rupture. The energy required for partial melting in this model is on the same order of the maximum energy required for the slip-weakening process in the shallow earthquake rupture. However, the verification of this model requires experimental work on the thermodynamic properties of rocks under non-hydrostatic stress. The solution of the deep earthquake problem will require an interdisciplinary study of seismology, high pressure rock mechanics, and mineralogy.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Geophysics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geosciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wallace, Terry C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleExploiting broadband seismograms and the mechanism of deep-focus earthquakesen_US
dc.creatorJiao, Wenjie, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorJiao, Wenjie, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractModern broadband seismic instrumentation has provided enormous opportunities to retrieve the information in almost any frequency band of seismic interest. In this thesis, we have investigated the long period responses of the broadband seismometers and the problem of recovering actual groundmotion. For the first time, we recovered the static offset for an earthquake from dynamic seismograms. The very long period waves of near- and intermediate-field term from 1994 large Bolivian deep earthquake (depth = 630km, MW and 1997 large Argentina deep earthquake (depth = 285km, MW are successfully recovered from the portable broadband recordings by BANJO and APVC networks. These waves provide another dynamic window into the seismic source process and may provide unique information to help constrain the source dynamics of deep earthquakes in the future. We have developed a new method to locate global explosion events based on broadband waveform stacking and simulated annealing. This method utilizes the information provided by the full broadband waveforms. Instead of "picking times", the character of the wavelet is used for locating events. The application of this methodology to a Lop Nor nuclear explosion is very successful, and suggests a procedure for automatic monitoring. We have discussed the problem of deep earthquakes from the viewpoint of rock mechanics and seismology. The rupture propagation of deep earthquakes requires a slip-weakening process unlike that for shallow events. However, this process is not necessarily the same as the process which triggers the rupture. Partial melting due to stress release is developed to account for the slip-weakening process in the deep earthquake rupture. The energy required for partial melting in this model is on the same order of the maximum energy required for the slip-weakening process in the shallow earthquake rupture. However, the verification of this model requires experimental work on the thermodynamic properties of rocks under non-hydrostatic stress. The solution of the deep earthquake problem will require an interdisciplinary study of seismology, high pressure rock mechanics, and mineralogy.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGeophysics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeosciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWallace, Terry C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9806767en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37516139en_US
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