Improving the interpretation and use of student ratings: A training approach

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282390
Title:
Improving the interpretation and use of student ratings: A training approach
Author:
Villaescusa, Tangie Kay, 1962-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation examines the faculty evaluation systems within the institutions of higher education today; with particular regard to how student ratings of instruction data are utilized, and by whom. Specifically, the knowledge, skills and attitudes of users of student ratings of instruction data and the effects of training on those who utilize such data. In this quasi-experimental study, a revised form of the "Using Student Ratings Data" questionnaire (Franklin & Theall, 1989) was used. The questionnaire, in its current form, consists of 70 items embedded in three subscales: knowledge, attitudes and skills; including seven demographic items. The questionnaire was designed to elicit what student ratings users knew about student ratings, their attitudes toward student ratings, and moreover, how their knowledge and attitudes affected their perceived skills in use. The revised form of the questionnaire was administered, pre and post, to participating faculty and administrators of institutes of higher learning from throughout the Continental United States and Puerto Rico. The participants were attendees at a workshop aimed at the development of a comprehensive faculty evaluation system. Obtained subscale reliability estimates of the questionnaire were moderate to high (.60-.81). Moreover, group differences were significant in both the knowledge and attitudinal subscales, suggesting that both the participant's knowledge and attitudes were positively affected by the training.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Administration.; Education, Educational Psychology.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Aleamoni, Lawrence M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleImproving the interpretation and use of student ratings: A training approachen_US
dc.creatorVillaescusa, Tangie Kay, 1962-en_US
dc.contributor.authorVillaescusa, Tangie Kay, 1962-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines the faculty evaluation systems within the institutions of higher education today; with particular regard to how student ratings of instruction data are utilized, and by whom. Specifically, the knowledge, skills and attitudes of users of student ratings of instruction data and the effects of training on those who utilize such data. In this quasi-experimental study, a revised form of the "Using Student Ratings Data" questionnaire (Franklin & Theall, 1989) was used. The questionnaire, in its current form, consists of 70 items embedded in three subscales: knowledge, attitudes and skills; including seven demographic items. The questionnaire was designed to elicit what student ratings users knew about student ratings, their attitudes toward student ratings, and moreover, how their knowledge and attitudes affected their perceived skills in use. The revised form of the questionnaire was administered, pre and post, to participating faculty and administrators of institutes of higher learning from throughout the Continental United States and Puerto Rico. The participants were attendees at a workshop aimed at the development of a comprehensive faculty evaluation system. Obtained subscale reliability estimates of the questionnaire were moderate to high (.60-.81). Moreover, group differences were significant in both the knowledge and attitudinal subscales, suggesting that both the participant's knowledge and attitudes were positively affected by the training.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Administration.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAleamoni, Lawrence M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9806755en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37510526en_US
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