Infants' expectations about the spatial and physical properties of a hidden object

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282389
Title:
Infants' expectations about the spatial and physical properties of a hidden object
Author:
Narter, Dana Beth, 1967-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this project was to investigate which spatial and physical object properties 9-month-old infants would use to trace an object in time and space. The particular object characteristics of interest were size, location and features. A two-location task was used, with looking time as the dependent measure. Infants observed a small toy troll, which was subsequently occluded. When the two flaps were removed, the infants observed either a standard or a change event. During the standard event no change occurred (the small troll was revealed at the same location). During a change event, some sort of physical or spatial change took place; the object might have changed its size (the large troll was revealed at the same location), its location (the small troll was revealed at the other location), its features (the small bear was revealed at the same location), or some combination of these attributes. Infants only observed one type of change event, depending on which of the seven conditions they were assigned to. The findings from this study can be interpreted in terms of two default assumptions: the Same Location/Same Object Rule and the Different Location/Different Object Rule. Nine-month olds use size cues to inform them about object identity in both situations; additionally, they use featural cues to inform them in the second case.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Developmental.; Psychology, Cognitive.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rosser, Rosemary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleInfants' expectations about the spatial and physical properties of a hidden objecten_US
dc.creatorNarter, Dana Beth, 1967-en_US
dc.contributor.authorNarter, Dana Beth, 1967-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this project was to investigate which spatial and physical object properties 9-month-old infants would use to trace an object in time and space. The particular object characteristics of interest were size, location and features. A two-location task was used, with looking time as the dependent measure. Infants observed a small toy troll, which was subsequently occluded. When the two flaps were removed, the infants observed either a standard or a change event. During the standard event no change occurred (the small troll was revealed at the same location). During a change event, some sort of physical or spatial change took place; the object might have changed its size (the large troll was revealed at the same location), its location (the small troll was revealed at the other location), its features (the small bear was revealed at the same location), or some combination of these attributes. Infants only observed one type of change event, depending on which of the seven conditions they were assigned to. The findings from this study can be interpreted in terms of two default assumptions: the Same Location/Same Object Rule and the Different Location/Different Object Rule. Nine-month olds use size cues to inform them about object identity in both situations; additionally, they use featural cues to inform them in the second case.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRosser, Rosemaryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9806754en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37510460en_US
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