Glasser's parent training model: Effects on child and parent functioning

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282387
Title:
Glasser's parent training model: Effects on child and parent functioning
Author:
Ward, Shirli Levinson, 1968-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The literature supports the use of parent training as a viable treatment for children with behavioral problems. Compared to other outpatient interventions for children with acting out behaviors, parent training has been shown to be the most effective treatment and also the most completely evaluated one. One issue related to the existing parent training programs is the use of individual or small group format, making them less cost-effective than a large group model. Another issue is that positive effects achieved in-home as a result of parent training rarely generalize to the school setting. The present study investigated Glasser's parent training program which was designed to decrease identified behaviors in the home as well as in the school. In addition, this program employs a large group format relative to other prominent parent training programs. A quasi-experimental, two group (i.e., treatment and comparison) pretest-posttest design was used for this study. Mothers with children ages 5 to 12 comprised the groups. Multivariate analyses of variances were conducted to examine the pre-post changes for the two groups with respect to child and parent functioning. Relative to the subjects in the comparison group, those involved in Glasser's parent training program demonstrated significant changes in parent functioning and child functioning (in-home, but not in the school setting).
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Behavioral.; Education, Adult and Continuing.; Education, Educational Psychology.; Sociology, Individual and Family Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bergan, John

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleGlasser's parent training model: Effects on child and parent functioningen_US
dc.creatorWard, Shirli Levinson, 1968-en_US
dc.contributor.authorWard, Shirli Levinson, 1968-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe literature supports the use of parent training as a viable treatment for children with behavioral problems. Compared to other outpatient interventions for children with acting out behaviors, parent training has been shown to be the most effective treatment and also the most completely evaluated one. One issue related to the existing parent training programs is the use of individual or small group format, making them less cost-effective than a large group model. Another issue is that positive effects achieved in-home as a result of parent training rarely generalize to the school setting. The present study investigated Glasser's parent training program which was designed to decrease identified behaviors in the home as well as in the school. In addition, this program employs a large group format relative to other prominent parent training programs. A quasi-experimental, two group (i.e., treatment and comparison) pretest-posttest design was used for this study. Mothers with children ages 5 to 12 comprised the groups. Multivariate analyses of variances were conducted to examine the pre-post changes for the two groups with respect to child and parent functioning. Relative to the subjects in the comparison group, those involved in Glasser's parent training program demonstrated significant changes in parent functioning and child functioning (in-home, but not in the school setting).en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Behavioral.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Adult and Continuing.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Individual and Family Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBergan, Johnen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9738996en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37455102en_US
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