Use of self-guided writing therapy as an intervention for trauma: A sample of incarcerated women

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282379
Title:
Use of self-guided writing therapy as an intervention for trauma: A sample of incarcerated women
Author:
Tromp, Shannon Noelle, 1971-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A growing body of scientific literature suggests that when individuals are asked to write about personally upsetting experiences, significant improvements in physical health are found. However, some attempts to replicate these findings and establish causal relationships between disclosure and health have yielded inconsistent results. Thus, in an effort to implement a narrative therapy utilizing a less typical sample, Pennebaker's self-guided writing therapy was utilized as an intervention for incarcerated women who had experienced traumatic events. Volunteer participants were randomly assigned to either the traumatic (experimental) or trivial topic (control) writing group, and were asked to write on these topics daily for four days. Objective medical utilization data was collected for the 12 weeks pre-intervention through 12 weeks post-intervention, and was supplemented by participant self-report measures. Institutional misconduct data was also collected for this period. No decreases in medical utilization or institutional misconduct were found. However, a significant increase in mental health utilization was demonstrated by the treatment group following the intervention. Implications of these findings and suggestions for future research in this area are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Psychobiology.; Women's Studies.; Psychology, Clinical.; Sociology, Criminology and Penology.; Psychology, Physiological.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kaszniak, Alfred W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleUse of self-guided writing therapy as an intervention for trauma: A sample of incarcerated womenen_US
dc.creatorTromp, Shannon Noelle, 1971-en_US
dc.contributor.authorTromp, Shannon Noelle, 1971-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA growing body of scientific literature suggests that when individuals are asked to write about personally upsetting experiences, significant improvements in physical health are found. However, some attempts to replicate these findings and establish causal relationships between disclosure and health have yielded inconsistent results. Thus, in an effort to implement a narrative therapy utilizing a less typical sample, Pennebaker's self-guided writing therapy was utilized as an intervention for incarcerated women who had experienced traumatic events. Volunteer participants were randomly assigned to either the traumatic (experimental) or trivial topic (control) writing group, and were asked to write on these topics daily for four days. Objective medical utilization data was collected for the 12 weeks pre-intervention through 12 weeks post-intervention, and was supplemented by participant self-report measures. Institutional misconduct data was also collected for this period. No decreases in medical utilization or institutional misconduct were found. However, a significant increase in mental health utilization was demonstrated by the treatment group following the intervention. Implications of these findings and suggestions for future research in this area are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Psychobiology.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Criminology and Penology.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Physiological.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKaszniak, Alfred W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9738960en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37474091en_US
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