Female aggression: Testing the Hera Hypothesis. A study of female competition over access to males in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282377
Title:
Female aggression: Testing the Hera Hypothesis. A study of female competition over access to males in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)
Author:
Joachim, Lorna Susan Roney, 1963-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Two semi-free ranging groups of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were observed over a nine month period on Morgan Island, South Carolina. The purpose of this study was to determine if the presence of males, rather than overall increased activity during the breeding and birthing seasons, resulted in higher rates of female-female aggression. This study was a test of the Hera Hypothesis: a model developed by the author in 1991 that predicted the existence of female intra-sexual competition. Repeated measures of affiliative behaviors and physical and non-physical aggression between subject and target monkeys were recorded and associated with the presence or absence of a male. Aggressive behavior was hypothesized to be a measure of female competition over mates, an arena mainly considered to be the domain of males alone. This study demonstrates that female rhesus monkeys do not aggress against each other more intensely when in the presence of a potential mate. In light of this I can only conclude that female rhesus monkeys do not use aggression as a means of competition over access to mates.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Physical.; Biology, Ecology.; Psychology, Behavioral.; Biology, Zoology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
King, James

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFemale aggression: Testing the Hera Hypothesis. A study of female competition over access to males in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)en_US
dc.creatorJoachim, Lorna Susan Roney, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorJoachim, Lorna Susan Roney, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTwo semi-free ranging groups of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were observed over a nine month period on Morgan Island, South Carolina. The purpose of this study was to determine if the presence of males, rather than overall increased activity during the breeding and birthing seasons, resulted in higher rates of female-female aggression. This study was a test of the Hera Hypothesis: a model developed by the author in 1991 that predicted the existence of female intra-sexual competition. Repeated measures of affiliative behaviors and physical and non-physical aggression between subject and target monkeys were recorded and associated with the presence or absence of a male. Aggressive behavior was hypothesized to be a measure of female competition over mates, an arena mainly considered to be the domain of males alone. This study demonstrates that female rhesus monkeys do not aggress against each other more intensely when in the presence of a potential mate. In light of this I can only conclude that female rhesus monkeys do not use aggression as a means of competition over access to mates.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Physical.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Behavioral.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Zoology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKing, Jamesen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9738955en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37468807en_US
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