¿Primera escritora colonial? Santa Rosa de Lima: Sus "Mercedes" y la "Escala Mistica"

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282362
Title:
¿Primera escritora colonial? Santa Rosa de Lima: Sus "Mercedes" y la "Escala Mistica"
Author:
Ibanez-Murphy, Carolina, 1960-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation is a cultural-historical reading of the text entitled Las Mercedes y La Escala Mistica written by Isabel Flores de Oliva, later canonized as Santa Rosa de Lima. The purpose of the present study is to analyze her iconolexic discourse as a unique type of mystic text within the realm of colonial Latin American feminine Literature. The first chapter describes, simultaneously, the discursive masculine tradition in the New World immediately following the Conquest, and the lack of discursive and written testimonies of women of the same era. Furthermore, we approach Santa Rosa's work with the help of Walter Mignolo's theory about colonial semiosis and its applicability to pictorical, oral and other cultural discourses. The second chapter centers its study on the socio-historical elements that surrounded Rosa at the time of her life and all those ideological and cultural variables that shaped her, allowing her to become the most venerated and beloved saint in the Americas. The third chapter focuses on the critical and analytical study of Santa Rosa's Mercedes and Escala Mistica. It shows the kind of strategies and conventions that the Saint employed in her texts. The dissertation concludes by desmitifying erroneous ideas about the saint, and demonstrating the fact that Santa Rosa was indeed the first mystic writer of colonial Peru and why she should be studied as such.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, Latin American.; Religion, History of.; History, Latin American.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Spanish and Portuguese
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rivero, Eliana S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoesen_US
dc.title¿Primera escritora colonial? Santa Rosa de Lima: Sus "Mercedes" y la "Escala Mistica"en_US
dc.creatorIbanez-Murphy, Carolina, 1960-en_US
dc.contributor.authorIbanez-Murphy, Carolina, 1960-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation is a cultural-historical reading of the text entitled Las Mercedes y La Escala Mistica written by Isabel Flores de Oliva, later canonized as Santa Rosa de Lima. The purpose of the present study is to analyze her iconolexic discourse as a unique type of mystic text within the realm of colonial Latin American feminine Literature. The first chapter describes, simultaneously, the discursive masculine tradition in the New World immediately following the Conquest, and the lack of discursive and written testimonies of women of the same era. Furthermore, we approach Santa Rosa's work with the help of Walter Mignolo's theory about colonial semiosis and its applicability to pictorical, oral and other cultural discourses. The second chapter centers its study on the socio-historical elements that surrounded Rosa at the time of her life and all those ideological and cultural variables that shaped her, allowing her to become the most venerated and beloved saint in the Americas. The third chapter focuses on the critical and analytical study of Santa Rosa's Mercedes and Escala Mistica. It shows the kind of strategies and conventions that the Saint employed in her texts. The dissertation concludes by desmitifying erroneous ideas about the saint, and demonstrating the fact that Santa Rosa was indeed the first mystic writer of colonial Peru and why she should be studied as such.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Latin American.en_US
dc.subjectReligion, History of.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Latin American.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpanish and Portugueseen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRivero, Eliana S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9738928en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37456805en_US
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