Reliability, validity and unique contributions of self-reports by adolescents being treated for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282354
Title:
Reliability, validity and unique contributions of self-reports by adolescents being treated for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
Author:
Smith, Bradley Harrison, 1961-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The current study assessed critical psychometric properties of self-reports by 46 adolescents enrolled in an eight week-long Summer Treatment Program (STP). Self-report instruments included the IOWA Conners ratings scales, self-ratings of the quality of interactions with peers and STP staff, and daily global ratings about overall performance. Counselors, teachers, and parents also completed ratings. Other dependent variables included measures of academic performance and direct observation of behaviors. All of the adolescents completed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of the effects of methylphenidate. Test-retest reliability and, when applicable, internal consistency of adolescents' self-reports was assessed. The convergent and discriminant validity of the ratings was assessed with a factor analytic structural equations multi-trait multi-method analysis. Criterion validity was assessed with a repeated measures analysis of variance with medication as the independent variable. Concurrent and incremental validity of the adolescents' self-reports were assessed with a hierarchical regression analysis. The results of this study indicate that adolescents can provide reliable and valid information about their response to treatment for ADHD. Compared to adolescents' self-reports; however, reports by counselors and teachers are more sensitive to the effects of treatment with medication. Nevertheless, adolescent self-reports appeared to have some unique predictive value. Within the context of this study, reports by parents did not have any incremental validity. Treatments for adolescents with ADHD are in the early stages of development and this psychometric study could have important ramifications for hundreds of thousands of adolescents who receive treatment for ADHD. These results are most applicable to clinic-referred adolescents receiving intensive behavioral treatment and a trial of methylphenidate.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Mental Health.; Health Sciences, Pharmacology.; Psychology, Developmental.; Psychology, Clinical.; Psychology, Psychometrics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sechrest, Lee B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleReliability, validity and unique contributions of self-reports by adolescents being treated for attention deficit hyperactivity disorderen_US
dc.creatorSmith, Bradley Harrison, 1961-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Bradley Harrison, 1961-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe current study assessed critical psychometric properties of self-reports by 46 adolescents enrolled in an eight week-long Summer Treatment Program (STP). Self-report instruments included the IOWA Conners ratings scales, self-ratings of the quality of interactions with peers and STP staff, and daily global ratings about overall performance. Counselors, teachers, and parents also completed ratings. Other dependent variables included measures of academic performance and direct observation of behaviors. All of the adolescents completed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of the effects of methylphenidate. Test-retest reliability and, when applicable, internal consistency of adolescents' self-reports was assessed. The convergent and discriminant validity of the ratings was assessed with a factor analytic structural equations multi-trait multi-method analysis. Criterion validity was assessed with a repeated measures analysis of variance with medication as the independent variable. Concurrent and incremental validity of the adolescents' self-reports were assessed with a hierarchical regression analysis. The results of this study indicate that adolescents can provide reliable and valid information about their response to treatment for ADHD. Compared to adolescents' self-reports; however, reports by counselors and teachers are more sensitive to the effects of treatment with medication. Nevertheless, adolescent self-reports appeared to have some unique predictive value. Within the context of this study, reports by parents did not have any incremental validity. Treatments for adolescents with ADHD are in the early stages of development and this psychometric study could have important ramifications for hundreds of thousands of adolescents who receive treatment for ADHD. These results are most applicable to clinic-referred adolescents receiving intensive behavioral treatment and a trial of methylphenidate.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Mental Health.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Pharmacology.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Psychometrics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSechrest, Lee B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9738918en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3745545xen_US
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