How female physicians perceive their professional roles: What's gender got to do with it?

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282352
Title:
How female physicians perceive their professional roles: What's gender got to do with it?
Author:
Pozner, Rochelle, 1936-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences and perceptions of two female obstetrician-gynecologists in their world of academic and clinical medicine. Significant to this dissertation is the complex issue of gender. The theoretical and research perspectives were (1) gender discrimination in the education of girls; (2) feminism in the medical school and the medical workplace; and (3) the literature of caring and connectiveness as it is related to the field of medicine. My prior pilot study and research for my gender issues course I taught in medical school were the deciding factors that initiated this richer dissertation study. The case study approach was used in this ethnographic research, and with my role as participant and a non-participant observer, I conducted multiple observations of participants, wrote field notes and conducted three semi-structured interviews with each participant. I analyzed the data inductively, and then made a cross-case analysis of the variables I found for my study. The findings from this study reveal the importance of family, husbands, and significant others in their continued support of their professional careers. Both participants had positive experiences in their early schooling and supportive mentors in their medical careers. They also agreed that relationships and interactions with patients are the most important aspects of their specialty, and that women doctors "listen more"; however, they believe that the environment plays a role in these differences related to gender. The biggest challenge perceived by the academic physician is the hostility of a system that does not recognize diversity or values of the female doctors who work in the system. She diagnoses this system as unhealthy and inflexible to both male and female physicians. The biggest challenge perceived by the married woman physician revolved around her juggling of family and professional concerns. The significant findings from the theoretical and historical perspectives relative to this study, braided with the insights voiced by the two physicians, strongly suggest a need for curricula and pedagogical restructuring related to feminist knowledge in both our medical institutions and our educational institutions.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Education.; Health Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.; Education, Teacher Training.; Sociology, Individual and Family Studies.; Education, Curriculum and Instruction.
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Teaching and TeachingEducation
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Horak, Willis J.; Fox, Dana L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHow female physicians perceive their professional roles: What's gender got to do with it?en_US
dc.creatorPozner, Rochelle, 1936-en_US
dc.contributor.authorPozner, Rochelle, 1936-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to describe the experiences and perceptions of two female obstetrician-gynecologists in their world of academic and clinical medicine. Significant to this dissertation is the complex issue of gender. The theoretical and research perspectives were (1) gender discrimination in the education of girls; (2) feminism in the medical school and the medical workplace; and (3) the literature of caring and connectiveness as it is related to the field of medicine. My prior pilot study and research for my gender issues course I taught in medical school were the deciding factors that initiated this richer dissertation study. The case study approach was used in this ethnographic research, and with my role as participant and a non-participant observer, I conducted multiple observations of participants, wrote field notes and conducted three semi-structured interviews with each participant. I analyzed the data inductively, and then made a cross-case analysis of the variables I found for my study. The findings from this study reveal the importance of family, husbands, and significant others in their continued support of their professional careers. Both participants had positive experiences in their early schooling and supportive mentors in their medical careers. They also agreed that relationships and interactions with patients are the most important aspects of their specialty, and that women doctors "listen more"; however, they believe that the environment plays a role in these differences related to gender. The biggest challenge perceived by the academic physician is the hostility of a system that does not recognize diversity or values of the female doctors who work in the system. She diagnoses this system as unhealthy and inflexible to both male and female physicians. The biggest challenge perceived by the married woman physician revolved around her juggling of family and professional concerns. The significant findings from the theoretical and historical perspectives relative to this study, braided with the insights voiced by the two physicians, strongly suggest a need for curricula and pedagogical restructuring related to feminist knowledge in both our medical institutions and our educational institutions.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Education.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Teacher Training.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Individual and Family Studies.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Curriculum and Instruction.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and TeachingEducationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHorak, Willis J.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorFox, Dana L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9729538en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34841337en_US
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