Adolescent males in a secure care setting: The relationship between psychopathy and gang affiliation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282349
Title:
Adolescent males in a secure care setting: The relationship between psychopathy and gang affiliation
Author:
King, Sloan Renee, 1963-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigated two variables that have been associated with violent behavior in adolescent males: psychopathy and gang affiliation. Twenty-one incarcerated male adolescents (ages 14-17) committed to a secure care setting participated in the study. Participants were identified as either gang members or non-gang members, and interviewed using the Psychopathy Checklist - Revised (PCL-R) (Hare, 1991). Results indicated that gang members as a group manifested higher levels of psychopathy than non-gang members as measured by the Total and Affective (Factor 1) scores of the PCL-R. However, interrater reliability was low on the Affective (Factor 1) scale, and Affective (Factor 1) results must be interpreted with caution. No significant differences emerged between gang members and non-gang members on the Behavior (Factor 2) score of the PCL-R. Therefore, incarcerated gang members and non-gang members did not differ significantly in delinquent offense history. In conclusion, significant differences emerged overall between gang members and non-gang members on the variable of psychopathy, establishing the presence of a relationship between psychopathy and gang affiliation. The recognition of psychopathy in influencing gang affiliation can complement existing sociological theories in understanding the complex nature of adolescents who affiliate with gangs.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Psychology, Developmental.; Psychology, Personality.; Sociology, Criminology and Penology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Education and Rehabilitation
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Smith, S. Mae

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAdolescent males in a secure care setting: The relationship between psychopathy and gang affiliationen_US
dc.creatorKing, Sloan Renee, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorKing, Sloan Renee, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated two variables that have been associated with violent behavior in adolescent males: psychopathy and gang affiliation. Twenty-one incarcerated male adolescents (ages 14-17) committed to a secure care setting participated in the study. Participants were identified as either gang members or non-gang members, and interviewed using the Psychopathy Checklist - Revised (PCL-R) (Hare, 1991). Results indicated that gang members as a group manifested higher levels of psychopathy than non-gang members as measured by the Total and Affective (Factor 1) scores of the PCL-R. However, interrater reliability was low on the Affective (Factor 1) scale, and Affective (Factor 1) results must be interpreted with caution. No significant differences emerged between gang members and non-gang members on the Behavior (Factor 2) score of the PCL-R. Therefore, incarcerated gang members and non-gang members did not differ significantly in delinquent offense history. In conclusion, significant differences emerged overall between gang members and non-gang members on the variable of psychopathy, establishing the presence of a relationship between psychopathy and gang affiliation. The recognition of psychopathy in influencing gang affiliation can complement existing sociological theories in understanding the complex nature of adolescents who affiliate with gangs.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Personality.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Criminology and Penology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSmith, S. Maeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9729536en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34841301en_US
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