Patriarchal voices and female authority in Katherine Anne Porter's Miranda stories

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282343
Title:
Patriarchal voices and female authority in Katherine Anne Porter's Miranda stories
Author:
Punzel, Andreas, 1955-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study offers a feminist reading of Katherine Anne Porter's Miranda stories and includes in its discussion "Old Morality," "Pale Horse, Pale Rider," and the stories of The Old Order as well as the "implicit" Miranda stories "Flowering Judas" and "Holiday." Focusing on questions of gender politics, the study traces the ways the representatives of patriarchal culture within Porter's texts attempt to circumscribe Miranda in traditional gender roles and examines the extent to which Miranda succeeds in asserting her independence. Central to the analysis is the argument that gender politics do not rely on methods of subjection and repression but instead employ strategies of subversion to effect Miranda's self-subjugation to and self-containment within the social order. The theoretical basis for this argument lies in the discourse theory of Mikhail Bakhtin and Michel Foucault's concept of power. Following Miranda's life chronologically, the study explores its main stages: her upbringing in the confining context of the family, which attempts to insert her into the prevailing sexual economy and traditional gender roles; her flight into the world and into a life of social and intellectual independence but also sexual self-abnegation; her escape from language into silence as a result of her marginalization; and her subsequent return to the world as a more assertive woman.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Women's Studies.; Literature, American.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dryden, Edgar A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePatriarchal voices and female authority in Katherine Anne Porter's Miranda storiesen_US
dc.creatorPunzel, Andreas, 1955-en_US
dc.contributor.authorPunzel, Andreas, 1955-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study offers a feminist reading of Katherine Anne Porter's Miranda stories and includes in its discussion "Old Morality," "Pale Horse, Pale Rider," and the stories of The Old Order as well as the "implicit" Miranda stories "Flowering Judas" and "Holiday." Focusing on questions of gender politics, the study traces the ways the representatives of patriarchal culture within Porter's texts attempt to circumscribe Miranda in traditional gender roles and examines the extent to which Miranda succeeds in asserting her independence. Central to the analysis is the argument that gender politics do not rely on methods of subjection and repression but instead employ strategies of subversion to effect Miranda's self-subjugation to and self-containment within the social order. The theoretical basis for this argument lies in the discourse theory of Mikhail Bakhtin and Michel Foucault's concept of power. Following Miranda's life chronologically, the study explores its main stages: her upbringing in the confining context of the family, which attempts to insert her into the prevailing sexual economy and traditional gender roles; her flight into the world and into a life of social and intellectual independence but also sexual self-abnegation; her escape from language into silence as a result of her marginalization; and her subsequent return to the world as a more assertive woman.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectLiterature, American.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDryden, Edgar A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9729520en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34819630en_US
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