Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282334
Title:
Consumer preference for logo designs: Visual design and meaning
Author:
Pimentel, Ronald Ward, 1955-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Logo designs provide a quick visual shorthand for all the meaning, associations, and equity associated with a brand. Virtually all major companies utilize logos, but there is little theory-based research regarding logo design published in marketing and consumer behavior journals. Related research from psychology regarding preference for visual images has generally used special stimuli created for the laboratory that do not carry the meaning that logos acquire in the markerplace and consequently have very limited generalizability. This study seeks to begin to fill the void by examining preference for actual, familiar logo designs. An improved understanding of preference for logo designs can be a great advantage to a company considering a logo design change. The costs involved in such a change can be enormous. Beyond the cost of the services of graphic designers, a change in logo design incurs the cost of changing everything that displays the logo, and any lost sales that may result if the new design is ineffective in some way. The equity of the brand may be connected to the logo design, so a change in the design of the logo may have long-term implications. Many logos have evolved over the years through successive changes to keep the designs from becoming outdated. This study examined theoretical bases for such activity. According to adaptation-level theory (McClelland et al. 1953), individuals become adapted to an object or image due to experience with it. Slight changes to this adaptation level result in increased preference while drastic changes result in decreased preference. These effects are represented by the distinctive butterfly curve. The current study developed a technique that allows for differentiation of visual designs, indicating the degree of change. This was used to test whether adaptation-level theory applies to familiar logo designs. The results indicate a general preference for no changes in familiar logo designs. While practitioners make changes in logo designs that are consistent with adaptation-level theory, it appears that consumers react instead, in accordance with social judgment theory--they tolerate rather than prefer the changes.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Business Administration, Marketing.; Design and Decorative Arts.; Psychology, Cognitive.; Mass Communications.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Business Administration
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Heckler, Susan E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleConsumer preference for logo designs: Visual design and meaningen_US
dc.creatorPimentel, Ronald Ward, 1955-en_US
dc.contributor.authorPimentel, Ronald Ward, 1955-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractLogo designs provide a quick visual shorthand for all the meaning, associations, and equity associated with a brand. Virtually all major companies utilize logos, but there is little theory-based research regarding logo design published in marketing and consumer behavior journals. Related research from psychology regarding preference for visual images has generally used special stimuli created for the laboratory that do not carry the meaning that logos acquire in the markerplace and consequently have very limited generalizability. This study seeks to begin to fill the void by examining preference for actual, familiar logo designs. An improved understanding of preference for logo designs can be a great advantage to a company considering a logo design change. The costs involved in such a change can be enormous. Beyond the cost of the services of graphic designers, a change in logo design incurs the cost of changing everything that displays the logo, and any lost sales that may result if the new design is ineffective in some way. The equity of the brand may be connected to the logo design, so a change in the design of the logo may have long-term implications. Many logos have evolved over the years through successive changes to keep the designs from becoming outdated. This study examined theoretical bases for such activity. According to adaptation-level theory (McClelland et al. 1953), individuals become adapted to an object or image due to experience with it. Slight changes to this adaptation level result in increased preference while drastic changes result in decreased preference. These effects are represented by the distinctive butterfly curve. The current study developed a technique that allows for differentiation of visual designs, indicating the degree of change. This was used to test whether adaptation-level theory applies to familiar logo designs. The results indicate a general preference for no changes in familiar logo designs. While practitioners make changes in logo designs that are consistent with adaptation-level theory, it appears that consumers react instead, in accordance with social judgment theory--they tolerate rather than prefer the changes.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Marketing.en_US
dc.subjectDesign and Decorative Arts.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Cognitive.en_US
dc.subjectMass Communications.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHeckler, Susan E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9729509en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3481808xen_US
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