Student absenteeism: An American Indian/Native American community perspective

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282330
Title:
Student absenteeism: An American Indian/Native American community perspective
Author:
Avery, Quinn
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Boloz and Lincoln (1983) conducted an intervention study concerning Native American student absences in the public schools in a rural setting. There is little known about Native American student absences in the public school in metropolitan areas. To address this issue, a qualitative study was conducted with the community members from an American Indian community in a metropolitan area. This community was chosen as a result of a pilot study that indicated there may be reasons for student absences not previously identified. The present research (a) documented the parents' and community members' understanding of student absenteeism in an American Indian community, (b) explored parents' and community members' values regarding school attendance in light of the values in the American Indian community, (c) examined the local district policy regarding absenteeism, (d) explored the congruence/incongruence of the local district policy with the family values in the American Indian community, and (e) explored collaborative problem solving directions the school district and community could consider. Nineteen people were interviewed. All had different positions within the community, including tribal administration, school personnel, parents and relatives of school children. Many interviewees functioned in more than one capacity such as tribal administrator and parent. Individual interviews and focus group sessions were analyzed using themes and categorical analysis to discern the community attitudes toward student absenteeism in the public schools. The study revealed that community members all valued education and school attendance. There were differences among people regarding their understanding of excused or unexcused absences. Parents and community members defined what they felt were responsibilities for themselves, school personnel, and tribal administration. School district policy defined student absences by using a coding system, yet parents and community members defined student absences in terms of family needs not district policy (e.g., there were many interpretations of what constituted illness). Parents and community members preferred to deal with school personnel on an individual basis although they expressed discomfort entering the schools. Several recommendations were made, based on parent and community member comments, for further dialogue among the parents, tribal administration, community members, school personnel, and district administration. Neither the American Indian community nor the school district were identified in this study to maintain anonymity for the American Indian people involved.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Bilingual and Multicultural.; Education, Administration.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Eduaction and Rehabilitation
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bos, Candace; Reyes, Elba

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleStudent absenteeism: An American Indian/Native American community perspectiveen_US
dc.creatorAvery, Quinnen_US
dc.contributor.authorAvery, Quinnen_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBoloz and Lincoln (1983) conducted an intervention study concerning Native American student absences in the public schools in a rural setting. There is little known about Native American student absences in the public school in metropolitan areas. To address this issue, a qualitative study was conducted with the community members from an American Indian community in a metropolitan area. This community was chosen as a result of a pilot study that indicated there may be reasons for student absences not previously identified. The present research (a) documented the parents' and community members' understanding of student absenteeism in an American Indian community, (b) explored parents' and community members' values regarding school attendance in light of the values in the American Indian community, (c) examined the local district policy regarding absenteeism, (d) explored the congruence/incongruence of the local district policy with the family values in the American Indian community, and (e) explored collaborative problem solving directions the school district and community could consider. Nineteen people were interviewed. All had different positions within the community, including tribal administration, school personnel, parents and relatives of school children. Many interviewees functioned in more than one capacity such as tribal administrator and parent. Individual interviews and focus group sessions were analyzed using themes and categorical analysis to discern the community attitudes toward student absenteeism in the public schools. The study revealed that community members all valued education and school attendance. There were differences among people regarding their understanding of excused or unexcused absences. Parents and community members defined what they felt were responsibilities for themselves, school personnel, and tribal administration. School district policy defined student absences by using a coding system, yet parents and community members defined student absences in terms of family needs not district policy (e.g., there were many interpretations of what constituted illness). Parents and community members preferred to deal with school personnel on an individual basis although they expressed discomfort entering the schools. Several recommendations were made, based on parent and community member comments, for further dialogue among the parents, tribal administration, community members, school personnel, and district administration. Neither the American Indian community nor the school district were identified in this study to maintain anonymity for the American Indian people involved.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Bilingual and Multicultural.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Administration.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Eduaction and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBos, Candaceen_US
dc.contributor.advisorReyes, Elbaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9729498en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34817062en_US
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