Broadband seismology and the detection and verification of underground nuclear explosions

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282322
Title:
Broadband seismology and the detection and verification of underground nuclear explosions
Author:
Tinker, Mark Andrew, 1968-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
On September 24, 1996, President Clinton signed the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), which bans the testing of all nuclear weapons thereby limiting their future development. Seismology is the primary tool used for the detection and identification of underground explosions and thus, will play a key role in monitoring a CTBT. The detection and identification of low yield explosions requires seismic stations at regional distances (1500 km). However, because the regional wavefield propagates within the extremely heterogeneous crustal waveguide, the seismic waveforms are also very complicated. Therefore, it is necessary to have a solid understanding of how the phases used in regional discriminants develop within different tectonic regimes. Thus, the development of the seismic phases Pn and Lg, which compose the seismic discriminant Pn/Lg, within the western U.S. from the Non-Proliferation Experiment are evaluated. The most fundamental discriminant is event location as 90% of all seismic sources occur too deep within the earth to be unnatural. France resumed its nuclear testing program after a four year moratorium and conducted six tests during a five month period starting in September of 1995. Using teleseismic data, a joint hypocenter determination algorithm was used to determine the hypocenters of these six explosions. One of the most important problems in monitoring a CTBT is the detection and location of small seismic events. Although seismic arrays have become the central tool for event detection, in the context of a global monitoring treaty, there will be some dependence on sparse regional networks of three-component broadband seismic stations to detect low yield explosions. However, the full power of the data has not been utilized, namely using phases other than P and S. Therefore, the information in the surface wavetrain is used to improve the locations of small seismic events recorded on a sparse network in Bolivia. Finally, as a discrimination example in a complex region, P to S ratios are used to determine source parameters of the Mw 8.3 deep Bolivia earthquake.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Geophysics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geosciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wallace, Terry C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBroadband seismology and the detection and verification of underground nuclear explosionsen_US
dc.creatorTinker, Mark Andrew, 1968-en_US
dc.contributor.authorTinker, Mark Andrew, 1968-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOn September 24, 1996, President Clinton signed the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), which bans the testing of all nuclear weapons thereby limiting their future development. Seismology is the primary tool used for the detection and identification of underground explosions and thus, will play a key role in monitoring a CTBT. The detection and identification of low yield explosions requires seismic stations at regional distances (1500 km). However, because the regional wavefield propagates within the extremely heterogeneous crustal waveguide, the seismic waveforms are also very complicated. Therefore, it is necessary to have a solid understanding of how the phases used in regional discriminants develop within different tectonic regimes. Thus, the development of the seismic phases Pn and Lg, which compose the seismic discriminant Pn/Lg, within the western U.S. from the Non-Proliferation Experiment are evaluated. The most fundamental discriminant is event location as 90% of all seismic sources occur too deep within the earth to be unnatural. France resumed its nuclear testing program after a four year moratorium and conducted six tests during a five month period starting in September of 1995. Using teleseismic data, a joint hypocenter determination algorithm was used to determine the hypocenters of these six explosions. One of the most important problems in monitoring a CTBT is the detection and location of small seismic events. Although seismic arrays have become the central tool for event detection, in the context of a global monitoring treaty, there will be some dependence on sparse regional networks of three-component broadband seismic stations to detect low yield explosions. However, the full power of the data has not been utilized, namely using phases other than P and S. Therefore, the information in the surface wavetrain is used to improve the locations of small seismic events recorded on a sparse network in Bolivia. Finally, as a discrimination example in a complex region, P to S ratios are used to determine source parameters of the Mw 8.3 deep Bolivia earthquake.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGeophysics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeosciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWallace, Terry C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9729486en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34812155en_US
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