Variables impacting the supply of majority female and male scientists and engineers

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282303
Title:
Variables impacting the supply of majority female and male scientists and engineers
Author:
McClure, Gregory Todd, 1995-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study is to improve understanding of the reasons women are less likely than men to choose to study collegiate-level physical science and engineering and why women have lower rates than men of working in the physical science and engineering occupations. The theoretical frameworks used to examine these questions are self-efficacy, as formulated by the psychologist Albert Bandura, and peer influence, as suggested by the anthropologists Holland and Eisenhart: It is important to note that self-efficacy and peer influences evolve throughout the lifetime, and differences in genders began to diverge dramatically at adolescence. This study, however, is primarily concerned with post-secondary outcomes and recommendations. The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979-1993 (NLSY) with an N = 12686 was utilized to create the database for this study. The analysis used an econometric method, multinomial logit analysis, to infer which of 30 some independent factors affect the mutually exclusive outcomes of majoring or working in other than the sciences and engineering, majoring or working in the biological sciences, and majoring or working in the physical sciences or engineering. The independent factors were those suggested by previous readings of the literature, e.g., demographics and high school attainment variables, as well as those additional independent factors available through the NLSY that pertain to self-efficacy and peer influence. The findings indicate that strong evidence exists to support both self-efficacy and peer influence. The results suggest convincing linkages between self-efficacy and the eventual major and occupation in the physical science and engineering. This study also reveals that peer influences are especially important in developing college major and career aspirations of girls and women.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Women's Studies.; Economics, Labor.; Sociology, Industrial and Labor Relations.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Leslie, Larry L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleVariables impacting the supply of majority female and male scientists and engineersen_US
dc.creatorMcClure, Gregory Todd, 1995-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcClure, Gregory Todd, 1995-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is to improve understanding of the reasons women are less likely than men to choose to study collegiate-level physical science and engineering and why women have lower rates than men of working in the physical science and engineering occupations. The theoretical frameworks used to examine these questions are self-efficacy, as formulated by the psychologist Albert Bandura, and peer influence, as suggested by the anthropologists Holland and Eisenhart: It is important to note that self-efficacy and peer influences evolve throughout the lifetime, and differences in genders began to diverge dramatically at adolescence. This study, however, is primarily concerned with post-secondary outcomes and recommendations. The National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979-1993 (NLSY) with an N = 12686 was utilized to create the database for this study. The analysis used an econometric method, multinomial logit analysis, to infer which of 30 some independent factors affect the mutually exclusive outcomes of majoring or working in other than the sciences and engineering, majoring or working in the biological sciences, and majoring or working in the physical sciences or engineering. The independent factors were those suggested by previous readings of the literature, e.g., demographics and high school attainment variables, as well as those additional independent factors available through the NLSY that pertain to self-efficacy and peer influence. The findings indicate that strong evidence exists to support both self-efficacy and peer influence. The results suggest convincing linkages between self-efficacy and the eventual major and occupation in the physical science and engineering. This study also reveals that peer influences are especially important in developing college major and career aspirations of girls and women.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectEconomics, Labor.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Industrial and Labor Relations.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLeslie, Larry L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9729447en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34796502en_US
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