Nutritional status of Sudanese adolescent girls and associated food behaviors

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282295
Title:
Nutritional status of Sudanese adolescent girls and associated food behaviors
Author:
El-Khalifa, Mofida Yousif
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study assesses the nutritional status of Sudanese adolescent girls and examines the determinants of this nutritional status. To represent distinctive socioeconomic classes, the sample included 767 subjects, 11-18 year-old students attending private and public schools in Khartoum (the capital). Anthropometric measurements revealed that there are no significant differences in the heights of the girls in the two schools. However, underweight is common among public school girls (25%), while overweight is common among the private school girls (23%). Questionnaire data showed that the strongest determinants of the girl's nutritional status were whether she attained menarche, her health, mother's estimated weight, whether her mother drives a car and whether her father owns a car. Prevalence of weight changing behavior was common (at the time of the study, 28% were trying to gain weight and 20% were trying to lose weight). A tendency toward normal body weight was detected. Intentions of the girls to change their weights were strongly affected by the girl's body mass index as well as her poor body image. Family influences (advice, encouragement and attempts of parents to change their own weight) were found to play a big role in the girl's decisions to change her weight. Sudanese adolescent girls from both private and public schools are concerned about their body weight. Thus, this study provides information that can be used to enhance nutrition interventions targeting Sudanese adolescent girls.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Nutrition.; Psychology, Developmental.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nutritional Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ritenbaugh, Cheryl

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleNutritional status of Sudanese adolescent girls and associated food behaviorsen_US
dc.creatorEl-Khalifa, Mofida Yousifen_US
dc.contributor.authorEl-Khalifa, Mofida Yousifen_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study assesses the nutritional status of Sudanese adolescent girls and examines the determinants of this nutritional status. To represent distinctive socioeconomic classes, the sample included 767 subjects, 11-18 year-old students attending private and public schools in Khartoum (the capital). Anthropometric measurements revealed that there are no significant differences in the heights of the girls in the two schools. However, underweight is common among public school girls (25%), while overweight is common among the private school girls (23%). Questionnaire data showed that the strongest determinants of the girl's nutritional status were whether she attained menarche, her health, mother's estimated weight, whether her mother drives a car and whether her father owns a car. Prevalence of weight changing behavior was common (at the time of the study, 28% were trying to gain weight and 20% were trying to lose weight). A tendency toward normal body weight was detected. Intentions of the girls to change their weights were strongly affected by the girl's body mass index as well as her poor body image. Family influences (advice, encouragement and attempts of parents to change their own weight) were found to play a big role in the girl's decisions to change her weight. Sudanese adolescent girls from both private and public schools are concerned about their body weight. Thus, this study provides information that can be used to enhance nutrition interventions targeting Sudanese adolescent girls.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nutrition.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRitenbaugh, Cherylen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9729432en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34795558en_US
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