THE CHARACTERIZATION OF BONDED PHASES FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282293
Title:
THE CHARACTERIZATION OF BONDED PHASES FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY
Author:
Stetzenbach, Klaus John
Issue Date:
1980
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The physical and chemical nature of chemically bonded phases used in high performance liquid chromatography have been studied. These bonded phases were characterized by a variety of chromotographic and non-chromatographic experiments. The non-chromatographic techniques included ¹³C NMR and batch extraction methods. The role played by the bonded phase as well as the mobile phase in determining the retention characteristics of the "stationary phase" were determined. The retention of solute molecules on bonded phases was found to be a function of the chain length of the bonded phase, the chemical nature of the bonded molecule, and the type of organic modifier used in the mobile phase. The energetics of the solute-stationary phase interactions was determined by the differential enthalpy and was found to be indicative of a partitioning process between two liquid phases. The retention process was also affected by the surface coverage of the bonded molecule. Optimum retention and separation characteristics were obtained with a hydrocarbon bonded phase of high surface coverage when used with a mobile phase containing a very polar organic modifier. The efficiency of these bonded phases was found to be independent of chain length as well as surface coverage of the bonded molecule. Some bonded phases which have specific functionalities incorporated into the bonded molecule are not true reversed phases. The selectivity of the bonded phases towards polar solute molecules was found to be affected by the type of organic modifier used in the mobile phase. The major accomplishment of this work shows that the stationary phase consists of the bonded molecule as well as trapped mobile phase. The composition of this ternary mixture is a function of the type and amount of bonded material and the type and amount of organic modifier used in the mobile phase.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Liquid chromatography.; Chemical bonds.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Chemistry
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Burke, Michael F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTHE CHARACTERIZATION OF BONDED PHASES FOR HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHYen_US
dc.creatorStetzenbach, Klaus Johnen_US
dc.contributor.authorStetzenbach, Klaus Johnen_US
dc.date.issued1980en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe physical and chemical nature of chemically bonded phases used in high performance liquid chromatography have been studied. These bonded phases were characterized by a variety of chromotographic and non-chromatographic experiments. The non-chromatographic techniques included ¹³C NMR and batch extraction methods. The role played by the bonded phase as well as the mobile phase in determining the retention characteristics of the "stationary phase" were determined. The retention of solute molecules on bonded phases was found to be a function of the chain length of the bonded phase, the chemical nature of the bonded molecule, and the type of organic modifier used in the mobile phase. The energetics of the solute-stationary phase interactions was determined by the differential enthalpy and was found to be indicative of a partitioning process between two liquid phases. The retention process was also affected by the surface coverage of the bonded molecule. Optimum retention and separation characteristics were obtained with a hydrocarbon bonded phase of high surface coverage when used with a mobile phase containing a very polar organic modifier. The efficiency of these bonded phases was found to be independent of chain length as well as surface coverage of the bonded molecule. Some bonded phases which have specific functionalities incorporated into the bonded molecule are not true reversed phases. The selectivity of the bonded phases towards polar solute molecules was found to be affected by the type of organic modifier used in the mobile phase. The major accomplishment of this work shows that the stationary phase consists of the bonded molecule as well as trapped mobile phase. The composition of this ternary mixture is a function of the type and amount of bonded material and the type and amount of organic modifier used in the mobile phase.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLiquid chromatography.en_US
dc.subjectChemical bonds.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBurke, Michael F.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8017813en_US
dc.identifier.oclc7547138en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b18069678en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.