Testing of the school-aged child and adolescent acceptance of asthma model

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282275
Title:
Testing of the school-aged child and adolescent acceptance of asthma model
Author:
Kintner, Eileen Kae, 1957-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
School-aged children and adolescents experiencing a chronic illness have verbalized and demonstrated difficulty in accepting their illness and the need for continued treatment. Few researchers have explored the school-aged child/adolescent process of acceptance. To assist school-aged children/adolescents toward acceptance, nurses must have a clear understanding of the process. This study is part of an ongoing program of research designed to increase nurses' understanding of the process of coming to accept asthma. The purpose of this study was to explore relationships among variables in the School-aged Child and Adolescent Acceptance of Chronic Illness Model. A Life-Span Developmental perspective guided the study. Multiple regression was used to test the theory. Concepts contained in the model were defined and operationalized, instruments were developed and/or identified, and relational statements were posed. The research question asked: What is the best linear path fit of the School-Aged Child and Adolescent Acceptance of Chronic Illness Model. The sample consisted of ninety-four school-aged children and adolescent diagnosed with asthma, between the ages of nine and fifteen years, and who were able to read and understand English. Subjects were recruited using the networking method. Path analysis determined the accuracy of the linear path model. Possible threats to validity of the model were examined. Results revealed school-aged child and adolescent acceptance of asthma was directly dependent upon one's perceived social support from his/her school teacher and classmates; and indirectly influenced by one's perceived social support from his/her parent, an objective measure of severity of illness rating, one's level of unrestricted participation in life activities, and one's perceived athletic competence. Results possess clinical and research implications for identifying, developing, and testing interventions to facilitate school-aged child and adolescent acceptance of asthma.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Nursing.; Psychology, Developmental.; Sociology, Individual and Family Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Haase, Joan E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTesting of the school-aged child and adolescent acceptance of asthma modelen_US
dc.creatorKintner, Eileen Kae, 1957-en_US
dc.contributor.authorKintner, Eileen Kae, 1957-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSchool-aged children and adolescents experiencing a chronic illness have verbalized and demonstrated difficulty in accepting their illness and the need for continued treatment. Few researchers have explored the school-aged child/adolescent process of acceptance. To assist school-aged children/adolescents toward acceptance, nurses must have a clear understanding of the process. This study is part of an ongoing program of research designed to increase nurses' understanding of the process of coming to accept asthma. The purpose of this study was to explore relationships among variables in the School-aged Child and Adolescent Acceptance of Chronic Illness Model. A Life-Span Developmental perspective guided the study. Multiple regression was used to test the theory. Concepts contained in the model were defined and operationalized, instruments were developed and/or identified, and relational statements were posed. The research question asked: What is the best linear path fit of the School-Aged Child and Adolescent Acceptance of Chronic Illness Model. The sample consisted of ninety-four school-aged children and adolescent diagnosed with asthma, between the ages of nine and fifteen years, and who were able to read and understand English. Subjects were recruited using the networking method. Path analysis determined the accuracy of the linear path model. Possible threats to validity of the model were examined. Results revealed school-aged child and adolescent acceptance of asthma was directly dependent upon one's perceived social support from his/her school teacher and classmates; and indirectly influenced by one's perceived social support from his/her parent, an objective measure of severity of illness rating, one's level of unrestricted participation in life activities, and one's perceived athletic competence. Results possess clinical and research implications for identifying, developing, and testing interventions to facilitate school-aged child and adolescent acceptance of asthma.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nursing.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Individual and Family Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHaase, Joan E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9720695en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34607729en_US
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