Source process of complex earthquakes by time-dependent moment tensor analysis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282274
Title:
Source process of complex earthquakes by time-dependent moment tensor analysis
Author:
Wu, Jun, 1962-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Seismic source complexity, which may be due to fault geometry changes or discrete subevents, is difficult to quantify with conventional moment tensor inversion techniques. The time-dependent moment tensor (TDMT) inversion procedure is an attempt to extract a time varying source from teleseismic P-waves. The correctness and the limits of the procedure are tested by synthetic examples. To remove the constant moment tensor assumption of the conventional time-independent moment tensor (TIMT) approach, a higher degree of freedom of the linear inversion system is required. The inversion is performed over a range of depths, and the solution is decomposed into subevents with varying depths and source geometry by the temporal consistency of the individual moment tensor elements and the condition of causality. Analysis of the synthetic examples indicates that the inverted moment tensor is sensitive to the crustal structure, particularly the crustal thickness. The inverted focal mechanism and the shape of the moment tensor elements are stable with respect to the uncertainties of the epicenter locations. Source processes of three recent complex earthquakes were investigated by the TDMT analysis. The results show that the October 18, 1992 Colombia earthquake is a double event with similar focal mechanisms. The first subevent is a smaller initial phase about 8 sec long. The second subevent initiated right after the initial phase. A total of five subevents are recognized for the July 30, 1995 Northern Chile earthquake. Four subevents ruptured in the first 34 sec with similar dip-slip focal mechanisms while the fifth subevent has a strike-slip focal mechanism. The Solomon Islands earthquake on August 16, 1995 is dominated by two shallowly dipping, dip-slip subevents with about the same moment release. Both TIMT and TDMT techniques and the GIS (Geographic Information Systems) are combined to study the tectonics of the Northwestern Colombia region. The focal solutions of the strongest events in this area are recovered and the geological environment is mapped by GIS. The 1992 sequence likely ruptured the Murindo fault system. The prevailing focal mechanism in this area suggests that a northwest-southeast compressional stress regime has dominated in the past 20 years.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Geophysics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wallace, Terry C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSource process of complex earthquakes by time-dependent moment tensor analysisen_US
dc.creatorWu, Jun, 1962-en_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, Jun, 1962-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSeismic source complexity, which may be due to fault geometry changes or discrete subevents, is difficult to quantify with conventional moment tensor inversion techniques. The time-dependent moment tensor (TDMT) inversion procedure is an attempt to extract a time varying source from teleseismic P-waves. The correctness and the limits of the procedure are tested by synthetic examples. To remove the constant moment tensor assumption of the conventional time-independent moment tensor (TIMT) approach, a higher degree of freedom of the linear inversion system is required. The inversion is performed over a range of depths, and the solution is decomposed into subevents with varying depths and source geometry by the temporal consistency of the individual moment tensor elements and the condition of causality. Analysis of the synthetic examples indicates that the inverted moment tensor is sensitive to the crustal structure, particularly the crustal thickness. The inverted focal mechanism and the shape of the moment tensor elements are stable with respect to the uncertainties of the epicenter locations. Source processes of three recent complex earthquakes were investigated by the TDMT analysis. The results show that the October 18, 1992 Colombia earthquake is a double event with similar focal mechanisms. The first subevent is a smaller initial phase about 8 sec long. The second subevent initiated right after the initial phase. A total of five subevents are recognized for the July 30, 1995 Northern Chile earthquake. Four subevents ruptured in the first 34 sec with similar dip-slip focal mechanisms while the fifth subevent has a strike-slip focal mechanism. The Solomon Islands earthquake on August 16, 1995 is dominated by two shallowly dipping, dip-slip subevents with about the same moment release. Both TIMT and TDMT techniques and the GIS (Geographic Information Systems) are combined to study the tectonics of the Northwestern Colombia region. The focal solutions of the strongest events in this area are recovered and the geological environment is mapped by GIS. The 1992 sequence likely ruptured the Murindo fault system. The prevailing focal mechanism in this area suggests that a northwest-southeast compressional stress regime has dominated in the past 20 years.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGeophysics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWallace, Terry C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9720693en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34605046en_US
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