Playing the lottery: Social action, social networks and accounts of motive

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282266
Title:
Playing the lottery: Social action, social networks and accounts of motive
Author:
Adams, Douglas James, 1957-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The game of LOTTO is the most common form of lottery participation in the U.S. Participation in LOTTO requires the purchase of a six-number lottery ticket. Individuals are allowed to select their ticket numbers, or they are assigned a randomly selected set of numbers. However, regardless of their historical persistence and geographic availability, lotteries continue to generate significant criticism and concern. Two issues dominate most public policy debate. Who plays the lottery, and why do they play? Traditionally, these questions are addressed using individualist models of social action. Such models assume that psychological internal states, such as attitudes, beliefs and processes of rationality are the primary mechanisms that facilitate participation. In contrast, structural models of social action suggest that networks of social relations, and the information and resources that flow through such relations are the primary mechanisms that facilitate participation. Using self-report survey data obtained from 245 randomly selected adults, as well as ethnographic data, I operationalize individualist and social network models, and examine two central issues: who participates in lotteries, and why do they participate. Three findings are particularly noteworthy. First, the empirically measured psychological internal states that many individual's possess about lottery participation appear inconsistent with several assumptions of the individualist model. Second, lottery participation appears to build solidarity between many participants and the members of their primary network of social relations through discussions about winning. Third, for most people the attraction of participation appears to be affective in nature rather than economic. Thus, lottery participation induces a state of positive anticipation. Further, the socially organized process that individual's initiate in order to induce this affective state is similar to, but quite different than the process of "emotion work." Thus, I label this process "emotion play."
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Sociology, Theory and Methods.; Psychology, Social.; Sociology, General.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Sociology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Snow, David A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titlePlaying the lottery: Social action, social networks and accounts of motiveen_US
dc.creatorAdams, Douglas James, 1957-en_US
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Douglas James, 1957-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe game of LOTTO is the most common form of lottery participation in the U.S. Participation in LOTTO requires the purchase of a six-number lottery ticket. Individuals are allowed to select their ticket numbers, or they are assigned a randomly selected set of numbers. However, regardless of their historical persistence and geographic availability, lotteries continue to generate significant criticism and concern. Two issues dominate most public policy debate. Who plays the lottery, and why do they play? Traditionally, these questions are addressed using individualist models of social action. Such models assume that psychological internal states, such as attitudes, beliefs and processes of rationality are the primary mechanisms that facilitate participation. In contrast, structural models of social action suggest that networks of social relations, and the information and resources that flow through such relations are the primary mechanisms that facilitate participation. Using self-report survey data obtained from 245 randomly selected adults, as well as ethnographic data, I operationalize individualist and social network models, and examine two central issues: who participates in lotteries, and why do they participate. Three findings are particularly noteworthy. First, the empirically measured psychological internal states that many individual's possess about lottery participation appear inconsistent with several assumptions of the individualist model. Second, lottery participation appears to build solidarity between many participants and the members of their primary network of social relations through discussions about winning. Third, for most people the attraction of participation appears to be affective in nature rather than economic. Thus, lottery participation induces a state of positive anticipation. Further, the socially organized process that individual's initiate in order to induce this affective state is similar to, but quite different than the process of "emotion work." Thus, I label this process "emotion play."en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Theory and Methods.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, General.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSociologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSnow, David A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9720683en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34585370en_US
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