El ombligo en la labor: Differentiation, interaction and integration in prehispanic Sinaloa, Mexico

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282237
Title:
El ombligo en la labor: Differentiation, interaction and integration in prehispanic Sinaloa, Mexico
Author:
Carpenter, John Philip, 1957-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Northwest Mexico, often characterized as a vast gulf (the so-called Chichimec Sea) between the complex societies associated with the Mesoamerican superarea and the middle-range societies of the American Southwest, remains poorly understood by both Mesoamericanists and Southwesternists. This research analyzes funerary remains in order to reconstruct aspects of social, political, economic and ideological organization of the Huatabampo/Guasave culture, a prehispanic complex in northern Sinaloa and southern Sonora, Mexico. The data are primarily derived from Gordon F. Ekholm's excavation of a large burial mound situated on an abandoned meander of the Rio Sinaloa, approximately six kilometers from the modern town of Guasave, Sinaloa. Whereas previous models have traditionally considered this area as a marginal periphery of both Mesoamerica and the American Southwest, this study directs attention to the role of indigenous developments in culture change, inter-regional interaction and integration. The results support the interpretation of this region as an environmentally, spatially and culturally intermediate area between West Mexico and the Southwest.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.; Anthropology, Cultural.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fish, Paul R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEl ombligo en la labor: Differentiation, interaction and integration in prehispanic Sinaloa, Mexicoen_US
dc.creatorCarpenter, John Philip, 1957-en_US
dc.contributor.authorCarpenter, John Philip, 1957-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractNorthwest Mexico, often characterized as a vast gulf (the so-called Chichimec Sea) between the complex societies associated with the Mesoamerican superarea and the middle-range societies of the American Southwest, remains poorly understood by both Mesoamericanists and Southwesternists. This research analyzes funerary remains in order to reconstruct aspects of social, political, economic and ideological organization of the Huatabampo/Guasave culture, a prehispanic complex in northern Sinaloa and southern Sonora, Mexico. The data are primarily derived from Gordon F. Ekholm's excavation of a large burial mound situated on an abandoned meander of the Rio Sinaloa, approximately six kilometers from the modern town of Guasave, Sinaloa. Whereas previous models have traditionally considered this area as a marginal periphery of both Mesoamerica and the American Southwest, this study directs attention to the role of indigenous developments in culture change, inter-regional interaction and integration. The results support the interpretation of this region as an environmentally, spatially and culturally intermediate area between West Mexico and the Southwest.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFish, Paul R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9720627en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3454673xen_US
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