Democracy's college: A case study of social processes in an urban community college

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282235
Title:
Democracy's college: A case study of social processes in an urban community college
Author:
Hanson, Chad Matthew, 1969-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In professional education literature, the American community college is referred to as "democracy's college" (Diekhoff, 1950, Griffith & Connor, 1994). Yet, what it means to be democracy's college is cloudy and uncertain. In the literature on community colleges, there is a great deal of ambiguity with respect to the schools' social and political goals. This study was designed to generate theoretical concepts that describe the processes involved in the structuring of a particular college's social and political purpose. This is a case study of Cactus Community College. In this study I used a variety of qualitative methods to explore and document some of the institution's basic social processes. The techniques I used include participant observation, interviews, a survey, and content analysis. Through each of these means, I gathered data that describe the public role of the college as it is enacted by the students and personnel who live and work there. I used Glaser and Strauss' "grounded theory method" to organize the sampling and analysis of data (Glaser & Strauss, 1967), and I used Anthony Giddens' "structuration" theory as an interpretive framework (Giddens, 1976, 1984, 1992). Together, the method and framework allowed me to develop a model of theoretical concepts that describe some of the basic social processes at Cactus Community College.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Community College.; Sociology, Social Structure and Development.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Woodard, Dudley B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDemocracy's college: A case study of social processes in an urban community collegeen_US
dc.creatorHanson, Chad Matthew, 1969-en_US
dc.contributor.authorHanson, Chad Matthew, 1969-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn professional education literature, the American community college is referred to as "democracy's college" (Diekhoff, 1950, Griffith & Connor, 1994). Yet, what it means to be democracy's college is cloudy and uncertain. In the literature on community colleges, there is a great deal of ambiguity with respect to the schools' social and political goals. This study was designed to generate theoretical concepts that describe the processes involved in the structuring of a particular college's social and political purpose. This is a case study of Cactus Community College. In this study I used a variety of qualitative methods to explore and document some of the institution's basic social processes. The techniques I used include participant observation, interviews, a survey, and content analysis. Through each of these means, I gathered data that describe the public role of the college as it is enacted by the students and personnel who live and work there. I used Glaser and Strauss' "grounded theory method" to organize the sampling and analysis of data (Glaser & Strauss, 1967), and I used Anthony Giddens' "structuration" theory as an interpretive framework (Giddens, 1976, 1984, 1992). Together, the method and framework allowed me to develop a model of theoretical concepts that describe some of the basic social processes at Cactus Community College.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Community College.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Social Structure and Development.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWoodard, Dudley B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9720619en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34542942en_US
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