Prospecting for biodiversity: The search for legal and institutional frameworks

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282221
Title:
Prospecting for biodiversity: The search for legal and institutional frameworks
Author:
Carrizosa, Santiago, 1964-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
For several decades, pharmaceutical companies have engaged in bioprospecting activities in developing countries. However, in many cases, these companies have failed to compensate local peoples for their knowledge used in the production of drugs. Consequently, these activities have been subject to intense scrutiny at the national and international level. This awareness has contributed to the elaboration of international laws and novel bioprospecting initiatives. The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), laws that regulate access to genetic resources, and the International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups (ICBGs) are approaches that address unique issues pertaining to bioprospecting of genetic resources. However, these approaches are not flawless. They are experiments that need to be tested and analyzed. The main objectives of this dissertation are to: (1) analyze the relationship between these approaches and how they address the issue of bioprospecting; and (2) identify bioprospecting guidelines to facilitate the implementation of future bioprospecting projects. These objectives are addressed through the analysis of a conceptual framework for the implementation of the ICBGs. According to this framework implementation of the ICBGs should be made according to the following four factors: (1) the CBD, (2) contractual relationships between parties of bioprospecting groups, (3) contractual provisions of bioprospecting agreements, and (4) in-country laws, policies and the organizational structure of the government. These factors have and will continue to affect the implementation of the ICBGs and other bioprospecting groups. A thorough analysis of them in the context of the ICBGs and in comparison to other projects provides elements for the identification of valuable lessons for future bioprospecting initiatives.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Chemistry, Pharmaceutical.; Political Science, General.; Political Science, International Law and Relations.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Shaw, William W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleProspecting for biodiversity: The search for legal and institutional frameworksen_US
dc.creatorCarrizosa, Santiago, 1964-en_US
dc.contributor.authorCarrizosa, Santiago, 1964-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFor several decades, pharmaceutical companies have engaged in bioprospecting activities in developing countries. However, in many cases, these companies have failed to compensate local peoples for their knowledge used in the production of drugs. Consequently, these activities have been subject to intense scrutiny at the national and international level. This awareness has contributed to the elaboration of international laws and novel bioprospecting initiatives. The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), laws that regulate access to genetic resources, and the International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups (ICBGs) are approaches that address unique issues pertaining to bioprospecting of genetic resources. However, these approaches are not flawless. They are experiments that need to be tested and analyzed. The main objectives of this dissertation are to: (1) analyze the relationship between these approaches and how they address the issue of bioprospecting; and (2) identify bioprospecting guidelines to facilitate the implementation of future bioprospecting projects. These objectives are addressed through the analysis of a conceptual framework for the implementation of the ICBGs. According to this framework implementation of the ICBGs should be made according to the following four factors: (1) the CBD, (2) contractual relationships between parties of bioprospecting groups, (3) contractual provisions of bioprospecting agreements, and (4) in-country laws, policies and the organizational structure of the government. These factors have and will continue to affect the implementation of the ICBGs and other bioprospecting groups. A thorough analysis of them in the context of the ICBGs and in comparison to other projects provides elements for the identification of valuable lessons for future bioprospecting initiatives.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectChemistry, Pharmaceutical.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, General.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, International Law and Relations.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorShaw, William W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9720602en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34528386en_US
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