Coping styles and stress levels of Chinese-American mothers of disabled children

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282216
Title:
Coping styles and stress levels of Chinese-American mothers of disabled children
Author:
Farajallah, Peiling Su, 1961-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to compare the coping styles and stress levels of Chinese-American mothers of children with and without educational disability. The Parenting Stress Index and Ways of Coping Questionnaire were translated into Chinese and sent to 350 mothers of Chinese-American students who were enrolled in the Seattle Public Schools during the 1995-96 school year. 52 mothers of disabled children and 55 mothers of non-disabled children returned completed questionnaires. Results indicated that, contrary to most research findings among Caucasian parents, no group differences were found to be statistically significant regarding overall parenting stress or stress related to child characteristics. Surprisingly, mothers with normally developing children experienced more stress that were related to social isolation and their sense of competence as a parent. They also more often used escape-avoidance coping strategies to deal with stress. This may be due to the fact that this particular group of respondents was younger and included relatively newer immigrants than the disabled group. Compared to mothers of normally developing children in this study, Chinese-American mothers with disabled children more often used confrontive coping strategies with some degree of hostility and risk-taking to alter the stressful situation. Implications for educational interventions and familial support were discussed. Directions for future research were proposed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Education, Educational Psychology.; Psychology, Clinical.; Sociology, Individual and Family Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mishra, Shitala; Domino, George

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCoping styles and stress levels of Chinese-American mothers of disabled childrenen_US
dc.creatorFarajallah, Peiling Su, 1961-en_US
dc.contributor.authorFarajallah, Peiling Su, 1961-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to compare the coping styles and stress levels of Chinese-American mothers of children with and without educational disability. The Parenting Stress Index and Ways of Coping Questionnaire were translated into Chinese and sent to 350 mothers of Chinese-American students who were enrolled in the Seattle Public Schools during the 1995-96 school year. 52 mothers of disabled children and 55 mothers of non-disabled children returned completed questionnaires. Results indicated that, contrary to most research findings among Caucasian parents, no group differences were found to be statistically significant regarding overall parenting stress or stress related to child characteristics. Surprisingly, mothers with normally developing children experienced more stress that were related to social isolation and their sense of competence as a parent. They also more often used escape-avoidance coping strategies to deal with stress. This may be due to the fact that this particular group of respondents was younger and included relatively newer immigrants than the disabled group. Compared to mothers of normally developing children in this study, Chinese-American mothers with disabled children more often used confrontive coping strategies with some degree of hostility and risk-taking to alter the stressful situation. Implications for educational interventions and familial support were discussed. Directions for future research were proposed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinical.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Individual and Family Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMishra, Shitalaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDomino, Georgeen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9720592en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34521355en_US
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