Optical characterization of wet chemically derived organic-inorganic hybrid (polyceram) films

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282206
Title:
Optical characterization of wet chemically derived organic-inorganic hybrid (polyceram) films
Author:
Motakef, Shahrnaz, 1968-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The present investigation is concerned with the processing and characterization of sol-gel derived Polyceram materials. Polycerams, a new class of multi-functional materials, are organic-inorganic composite materials where the components are combined at or near the molecular level. In this dissertation, particular emphasis is attributed to the synthesis, processing and characterization of thin films of Polycerams. Numerous optical characterization techniques were performed to study the passive properties of Polycerams, including index of refraction, optical attenuation, UV transmission and surface embossing. Dielectric waveguides of superior optical quality were obtained and Polycerams proved to be surface patternable with near-perfect shape replication abilities. The above properties are discussed in conjunction with a scattering model which explains the structural homogeneity of Polycerams. Optical losses below 0.15 dB/cm and the simple fabrication of channel waveguides and lenses via surface embossing render Polycerams highly suitable candidates for today's integrated optics technology.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Engineering, Materials Science.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Materials Science and Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Uhlmann, Donald R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleOptical characterization of wet chemically derived organic-inorganic hybrid (polyceram) filmsen_US
dc.creatorMotakef, Shahrnaz, 1968-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMotakef, Shahrnaz, 1968-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe present investigation is concerned with the processing and characterization of sol-gel derived Polyceram materials. Polycerams, a new class of multi-functional materials, are organic-inorganic composite materials where the components are combined at or near the molecular level. In this dissertation, particular emphasis is attributed to the synthesis, processing and characterization of thin films of Polycerams. Numerous optical characterization techniques were performed to study the passive properties of Polycerams, including index of refraction, optical attenuation, UV transmission and surface embossing. Dielectric waveguides of superior optical quality were obtained and Polycerams proved to be surface patternable with near-perfect shape replication abilities. The above properties are discussed in conjunction with a scattering model which explains the structural homogeneity of Polycerams. Optical losses below 0.15 dB/cm and the simple fabrication of channel waveguides and lenses via surface embossing render Polycerams highly suitable candidates for today's integrated optics technology.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Materials Science.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMaterials Science and Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorUhlmann, Donald R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9720576en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3450722xen_US
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