Influence of land use and climate on soils and forest structure in mountains of the southwestern United States and northern Mexico

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282199
Title:
Influence of land use and climate on soils and forest structure in mountains of the southwestern United States and northern Mexico
Author:
Villanueva, Diaz Jose, 1958-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The effects of land-use history in the Animas Mountains, New Mexico (AM) and the Sierra los Ajos, Sonora (SLA) were studied in relation to morphological and soil chemical characteristics, radial and basal area growth, and forest structure. Litter depth, organic matter, total nitrogen, CEC, and exchangeable cations were greater in the AM than in the SLA, apparently as a result of differences in fire frequency and other land uses. Seasonal precipitation (October-January) was reconstructed for the AM. Annual precipitation (July-July) was reconstructed for the SLA. July PDSI was reconstructed for both mountain ranges. Fires in the AM were preceded by relatively wet conditions two years before the fire year. No significant climate-fire relationship was found in the SLA. Tree radial and basal area increase differed between mountain ranges, suggesting that annual growth was influenced by differences in land-use history. Fire suppression activities and other land uses in the AM apparently have produced an increase in tree density and dominance of shade-tolerant but less-fire resistant species (i.e. Douglas-fir, southwestern white pine, pinyon pine). More frequent fires and logging activities in the SLA apparently have produced lower tree densities and dominance by shade-intolerant ponderosa pine.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Hydrology.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.; Agriculture, Soil Science.; Agriculture, Range Management.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McPherson, Guy R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleInfluence of land use and climate on soils and forest structure in mountains of the southwestern United States and northern Mexicoen_US
dc.creatorVillanueva, Diaz Jose, 1958-en_US
dc.contributor.authorVillanueva, Diaz Jose, 1958-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe effects of land-use history in the Animas Mountains, New Mexico (AM) and the Sierra los Ajos, Sonora (SLA) were studied in relation to morphological and soil chemical characteristics, radial and basal area growth, and forest structure. Litter depth, organic matter, total nitrogen, CEC, and exchangeable cations were greater in the AM than in the SLA, apparently as a result of differences in fire frequency and other land uses. Seasonal precipitation (October-January) was reconstructed for the AM. Annual precipitation (July-July) was reconstructed for the SLA. July PDSI was reconstructed for both mountain ranges. Fires in the AM were preceded by relatively wet conditions two years before the fire year. No significant climate-fire relationship was found in the SLA. Tree radial and basal area increase differed between mountain ranges, suggesting that annual growth was influenced by differences in land-use history. Fire suppression activities and other land uses in the AM apparently have produced an increase in tree density and dominance of shade-tolerant but less-fire resistant species (i.e. Douglas-fir, southwestern white pine, pinyon pine). More frequent fires and logging activities in the SLA apparently have produced lower tree densities and dominance by shade-intolerant ponderosa pine.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Soil Science.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Range Management.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcPherson, Guy R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9720566en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37699581en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34498655en_US
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