Late Quaternary vegetation history of the southern Owens Valley region, Inyo County, California

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282184
Title:
Late Quaternary vegetation history of the southern Owens Valley region, Inyo County, California
Author:
Woolfenden, Wallace Bird, 1941-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study analyzes the pollen, spores, and algae in the upper 90 m section of a mostly continuous, well dated, 323 m core (OL-92) from Owens Lake, southeastern California. The entire core has produced a paleoclimatic record for the past ∼800 ka. The 90 m interval dates from ∼9 ka to ∼151 ka beginning with the penultimate glaciation and ending during the termination of the last glaciation. The record shows high amplitude fluctuations in the abundances of pine, juniper, saltbush, sagebrush, chenopods/amaranths, and Ambrosia-type pollen. High percentages of juniper pollen with low percentages of desertscrub pollen during the intervals ∼150 ka to ∼120 ka and 73 ka to ∼20 ka alternate with low juniper pollen and relatively high percentages of desertscrub and oak pollen during the intervals ∼118 ka to ∼103 ka and ∼18 ka ∼10 ka and into the Holocene. Sagebrush pollen varies with juniper pollen but has a tendency to lead it in time. Pine and fir pollen tends to vary inversely with juniper over the long term. These trends are interpreted as vegetation change in response to glacial-interglacial cycles: During cold-wet glacial climates there was a downslope expansion of juniper woodland and sagebrush scrub, contraction of Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest, and displacement of warm desertscrub, suggesting average temperature and precipitation departures from modern values ranging from -2°C to -6°C and from +100 mm to +350 mm. Conversely under warmer and drier interglacials warm desert shrubs expanded their range in the lowlands, juniper and sagebrush retreated upslope, and the Sierran forests expanded. Estimated average temperature and precipitation departures from modern values ranged from -0.5°C to +3.7°C and +13 to -26 mm. Comparison of the pollen spectra spanning the penultimate and ultimate glacial maxima shows the former to have been longer and more intense, in accord with the Sierra Nevada glacial record. Similarly, the higher abundances of Ambrosia pollen during the last interglaciation, compared to the Holocene, indicate warmer temperatures in the former. The presence of high oak percentages also during the last interglaciation suggest an expansion of the summer monsoon. Finally, the match of the juniper curve with the marine oxygen isotope chronostratigraphy suggests a link between vegetation change in the southern Owens Valley and global climate.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Paleobotany.; Paleoecology.; Palynology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geosciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Davis, Owen K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleLate Quaternary vegetation history of the southern Owens Valley region, Inyo County, Californiaen_US
dc.creatorWoolfenden, Wallace Bird, 1941-en_US
dc.contributor.authorWoolfenden, Wallace Bird, 1941-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study analyzes the pollen, spores, and algae in the upper 90 m section of a mostly continuous, well dated, 323 m core (OL-92) from Owens Lake, southeastern California. The entire core has produced a paleoclimatic record for the past ∼800 ka. The 90 m interval dates from ∼9 ka to ∼151 ka beginning with the penultimate glaciation and ending during the termination of the last glaciation. The record shows high amplitude fluctuations in the abundances of pine, juniper, saltbush, sagebrush, chenopods/amaranths, and Ambrosia-type pollen. High percentages of juniper pollen with low percentages of desertscrub pollen during the intervals ∼150 ka to ∼120 ka and 73 ka to ∼20 ka alternate with low juniper pollen and relatively high percentages of desertscrub and oak pollen during the intervals ∼118 ka to ∼103 ka and ∼18 ka ∼10 ka and into the Holocene. Sagebrush pollen varies with juniper pollen but has a tendency to lead it in time. Pine and fir pollen tends to vary inversely with juniper over the long term. These trends are interpreted as vegetation change in response to glacial-interglacial cycles: During cold-wet glacial climates there was a downslope expansion of juniper woodland and sagebrush scrub, contraction of Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest, and displacement of warm desertscrub, suggesting average temperature and precipitation departures from modern values ranging from -2°C to -6°C and from +100 mm to +350 mm. Conversely under warmer and drier interglacials warm desert shrubs expanded their range in the lowlands, juniper and sagebrush retreated upslope, and the Sierran forests expanded. Estimated average temperature and precipitation departures from modern values ranged from -0.5°C to +3.7°C and +13 to -26 mm. Comparison of the pollen spectra spanning the penultimate and ultimate glacial maxima shows the former to have been longer and more intense, in accord with the Sierra Nevada glacial record. Similarly, the higher abundances of Ambrosia pollen during the last interglaciation, compared to the Holocene, indicate warmer temperatures in the former. The presence of high oak percentages also during the last interglaciation suggest an expansion of the summer monsoon. Finally, the match of the juniper curve with the marine oxygen isotope chronostratigraphy suggests a link between vegetation change in the southern Owens Valley and global climate.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPaleobotany.en_US
dc.subjectPaleoecology.en_US
dc.subjectPalynology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeosciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDavis, Owen K.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9713433en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3444919xen_US
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