Contentious voices amid the order: The Porfirian press in Mexico City, 1876-1911

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282183
Title:
Contentious voices amid the order: The Porfirian press in Mexico City, 1876-1911
Author:
Smith, Phyllis Lynn, 1959-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Porfirian press in Mexico City (1876-1911) presents an ideal case study for late nineteenth-century Mexican society. This particular epoch in Mexican history represented a time of fundamental change as the country emerged from nearly a half century of chaos and internecine strife into a modern, prosperous and orderly county. For the historian of this important and transforming era, newspapers serve as cultural mirrors, providing images that allow us to see, interpret and understand this society. In this role as cultural actors, the Porfirian press served five defining roles: it was a power resource with the potential to influence, shape and control society; it was the arena where the social, economic and political events of society were publicly acted out; it was the source of the definitions and images that comprised the shared reality; it designated fame and celebrity status to individuals in that society; and it set the parameters of what was normal and abnormal in that society. This study of Porfirian newspapers in Mexico City reveals three fundamental aspects: capital society was highly diverse and contentious, Mexico City residents faced divergent social and political problems and these newspapers mirrored a changing and modernizing nation--they not only chronicled this transformation, they were directly part of it.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, Latin American.; Journalism.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Meyer, Michael C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleContentious voices amid the order: The Porfirian press in Mexico City, 1876-1911en_US
dc.creatorSmith, Phyllis Lynn, 1959-en_US
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Phyllis Lynn, 1959-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Porfirian press in Mexico City (1876-1911) presents an ideal case study for late nineteenth-century Mexican society. This particular epoch in Mexican history represented a time of fundamental change as the country emerged from nearly a half century of chaos and internecine strife into a modern, prosperous and orderly county. For the historian of this important and transforming era, newspapers serve as cultural mirrors, providing images that allow us to see, interpret and understand this society. In this role as cultural actors, the Porfirian press served five defining roles: it was a power resource with the potential to influence, shape and control society; it was the arena where the social, economic and political events of society were publicly acted out; it was the source of the definitions and images that comprised the shared reality; it designated fame and celebrity status to individuals in that society; and it set the parameters of what was normal and abnormal in that society. This study of Porfirian newspapers in Mexico City reveals three fundamental aspects: capital society was highly diverse and contentious, Mexico City residents faced divergent social and political problems and these newspapers mirrored a changing and modernizing nation--they not only chronicled this transformation, they were directly part of it.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Latin American.en_US
dc.subjectJournalism.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMeyer, Michael C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9713432en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b37699556en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34449103en_US
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