Moving toward a literature-based classroom in a middle school context

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282157
Title:
Moving toward a literature-based classroom in a middle school context
Author:
Pritchard, Teri Gail, 1956-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Located within the framework of qualitative research (Bogdan & Biklin, 1992; Erickson, 1986), the primary purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics and significant issues related to moving toward a literature-based classroom in a middle school context. More specifically, this study interpreted and analyzed the perceptions of the classroom teacher and her students of the significant aspects of moving toward a literature-based classroom and described the issues and problems related to making that move. A process of observing, interviewing, and audiotaping, videotaping, and participating in classroom events occurred throughout the two phases of this study. The major data sources include field notes and interviews. Secondary sources include students' journals, inquiry booklets and inquiry project artifacts, audiotapings, videotapings, and other related artifacts. Data analysis was based on Glaser and Strauss's (1967) method of constant comparison. Data were analyzed for categories and themes. As these emerged, the data were coded and placed in the corresponding categories and themes. This in turn led to the development and exploration of trends related to this classroom. The analysis was used to develop a "thick description" of the characteristics and issues involved in moving toward a literature-based classroom within a middle school setting. Interpretations of the data include the teacher's understandings of reading and literature, beliefs about teacher as learner, understandings about the inquiry group process and its connections to research; the students' understandings of reading and literature, responding to the literature, making connections with the literature, and participating in inquiry groups; and the problems and issues related to this move, including the emerging role of the teacher, the use of children's and adolescent literature with the students, the students' responses to the literature, and the powerful role of the inquiry groups. Six implications can be drawn from this research. These implications include the characteristics of this particular classroom in moving toward literature-based instruction; the teacher and students as curriculum designers; the teacher, students, and university researcher learning together and individually; the voice of the participants as vital components in research; aspects of literature-based research; and temporal aspects of research methodology.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Language and Literature.; Education, Secondary.; Education, Reading.; Education, Curriculum and Instruction.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading and Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Short, Kathy G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMoving toward a literature-based classroom in a middle school contexten_US
dc.creatorPritchard, Teri Gail, 1956-en_US
dc.contributor.authorPritchard, Teri Gail, 1956-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractLocated within the framework of qualitative research (Bogdan & Biklin, 1992; Erickson, 1986), the primary purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics and significant issues related to moving toward a literature-based classroom in a middle school context. More specifically, this study interpreted and analyzed the perceptions of the classroom teacher and her students of the significant aspects of moving toward a literature-based classroom and described the issues and problems related to making that move. A process of observing, interviewing, and audiotaping, videotaping, and participating in classroom events occurred throughout the two phases of this study. The major data sources include field notes and interviews. Secondary sources include students' journals, inquiry booklets and inquiry project artifacts, audiotapings, videotapings, and other related artifacts. Data analysis was based on Glaser and Strauss's (1967) method of constant comparison. Data were analyzed for categories and themes. As these emerged, the data were coded and placed in the corresponding categories and themes. This in turn led to the development and exploration of trends related to this classroom. The analysis was used to develop a "thick description" of the characteristics and issues involved in moving toward a literature-based classroom within a middle school setting. Interpretations of the data include the teacher's understandings of reading and literature, beliefs about teacher as learner, understandings about the inquiry group process and its connections to research; the students' understandings of reading and literature, responding to the literature, making connections with the literature, and participating in inquiry groups; and the problems and issues related to this move, including the emerging role of the teacher, the use of children's and adolescent literature with the students, the students' responses to the literature, and the powerful role of the inquiry groups. Six implications can be drawn from this research. These implications include the characteristics of this particular classroom in moving toward literature-based instruction; the teacher and students as curriculum designers; the teacher, students, and university researcher learning together and individually; the voice of the participants as vital components in research; aspects of literature-based research; and temporal aspects of research methodology.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Language and Literature.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Secondary.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Reading.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Curriculum and Instruction.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorShort, Kathy G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9713388en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34386063en_US
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