Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282138
Title:
EVALUATION OF PROTEIN QUALITY USING MICE VS. RATS
Author:
Cossack, Zafrallah Taha
Issue Date:
1980
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Experiments were designed to investigate the possibility of using mice as model animals for the evaluation of protein quality, and to compare it with rats under the same conditions. Parameters measured were protein efficiency ratio, net protein ratio, protein digestion and relative protein value. Six sources of protein were tested at three dietary levels for each. Measurements were taken at four different periods of feeding, thus, the effects of dietary level of protein and the length of the feeding period were studied. Results on mouse experiment indicated that the highest PER values were obtained at 6 and 8% levels of dietary protein with significantly lower values when 11% levels were fed. The highest NPR values were obtained at 6% level of dietary protein then declined when 8 or 11% levels were fed. The highest efficiency regarding PER and NPR were obtained when mice were fed for 10 days than when they were fed for 14, 21, or 28 days of experiment. High quality protein sources were needed at lower levels in the diet for shorter periods of time to obtain the maximum efficiency when compared to poor quality sources of protein. Results for protein digestion did not correlate with those of PER, NPR or RPV indicating that protein digestion is a poor measurement. However, PER, NPR, and RPV were highly correlated. Results of rat experiment were in agreement with what was reported in the numerous works for rat bioassay in the literature review. Rate of body weight gain increased with increasing levels of dietary protein and the PER reached a maximum value, then decreased. Values of NPR tended to fall with increasing levels of dietary protein. PER values tended to increase gradually with prolonged period of feeding, then decline. The maximum PER values were obtained when 10% level of dietary protein was fed for a period of 15 days. Likewise mice experiment, PER, NPR, and RPV correlated highly while protein digestion correlated poorly with the other methods used. In general mice appeared to be influenced by the same factors as rats when used for the evaluation of protein quality. Mouse could be used as a model animal for protein quality evaluation with the advantages of small animal size, lower feed intake, shorter period of feeding, plus is highly desirable for experiments involving the use of isotopes or whole carcass analysis. A dietary protein level of 8% for a feeding period of 10 days would be suitable for use with mice instead of a 10% dietary level for a 28 day feeding experiment in rats. Whole eggs could be used as a suitable reference standard protein for mouse bioassay.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Proteins in animal nutrition.; Mice -- Feed utilization efficiency.; Rats -- Feed utilization efficiency.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nutritional Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Weber, Charles W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleEVALUATION OF PROTEIN QUALITY USING MICE VS. RATSen_US
dc.creatorCossack, Zafrallah Tahaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCossack, Zafrallah Tahaen_US
dc.date.issued1980en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractExperiments were designed to investigate the possibility of using mice as model animals for the evaluation of protein quality, and to compare it with rats under the same conditions. Parameters measured were protein efficiency ratio, net protein ratio, protein digestion and relative protein value. Six sources of protein were tested at three dietary levels for each. Measurements were taken at four different periods of feeding, thus, the effects of dietary level of protein and the length of the feeding period were studied. Results on mouse experiment indicated that the highest PER values were obtained at 6 and 8% levels of dietary protein with significantly lower values when 11% levels were fed. The highest NPR values were obtained at 6% level of dietary protein then declined when 8 or 11% levels were fed. The highest efficiency regarding PER and NPR were obtained when mice were fed for 10 days than when they were fed for 14, 21, or 28 days of experiment. High quality protein sources were needed at lower levels in the diet for shorter periods of time to obtain the maximum efficiency when compared to poor quality sources of protein. Results for protein digestion did not correlate with those of PER, NPR or RPV indicating that protein digestion is a poor measurement. However, PER, NPR, and RPV were highly correlated. Results of rat experiment were in agreement with what was reported in the numerous works for rat bioassay in the literature review. Rate of body weight gain increased with increasing levels of dietary protein and the PER reached a maximum value, then decreased. Values of NPR tended to fall with increasing levels of dietary protein. PER values tended to increase gradually with prolonged period of feeding, then decline. The maximum PER values were obtained when 10% level of dietary protein was fed for a period of 15 days. Likewise mice experiment, PER, NPR, and RPV correlated highly while protein digestion correlated poorly with the other methods used. In general mice appeared to be influenced by the same factors as rats when used for the evaluation of protein quality. Mouse could be used as a model animal for protein quality evaluation with the advantages of small animal size, lower feed intake, shorter period of feeding, plus is highly desirable for experiments involving the use of isotopes or whole carcass analysis. A dietary protein level of 8% for a feeding period of 10 days would be suitable for use with mice instead of a 10% dietary level for a 28 day feeding experiment in rats. Whole eggs could be used as a suitable reference standard protein for mouse bioassay.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectProteins in animal nutrition.en_US
dc.subjectMice -- Feed utilization efficiency.en_US
dc.subjectRats -- Feed utilization efficiency.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWeber, Charles W.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8017792en_US
dc.identifier.oclc7592220en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b13457214en_US
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