Elementary and secondary preservice educators' attitudes and knowledge about attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282128
Title:
Elementary and secondary preservice educators' attitudes and knowledge about attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
Author:
Grynkewich, Magda Ann Urban, 1952-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
General education teachers are largely responsible for the education of students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). This is partially due to the educational movement toward inclusion for students with disabilities, and partially due to the ability of about 50% of students with ADHD to progress normally in school when given classroom accommodations and/or instructional modifications. General educators are teaching students with ADHD, yet limited information about teacher attitudes and knowledge about ADHD exists. This study is an initial exploratory investigation that examined the attitudes and knowledge about ADHD of preservice general education teachers at the elementary and secondary levels. Preservice elementary and secondary teachers completed an instrument designed to assess their attitudes and knowledge regarding ADHD. Two scales were created: one scale for items related to attitudes, and the second scale related to basic knowledge about ADHD. Research questions addressed preservice teachers' overall attitude and knowledge about ADHD, and whether grade level, gender, or perceived experience with ADHD influenced their attitude and/or knowledge about ADHD. Findings demonstrated that preservice teachers were in general agreement with positive attitude statements about ADHD. Differences in attitude ratings by grade level were significant, with elementary preservice teachers in stronger agreement with statements about ADHD than secondary preservice teachers. No significant differences in attitude were evident for gender. There was, however, a significant difference in attitude based on teachers' reported experience with ADHD. Teachers with basic or moderate/extensive experience had significantly more positive attitudes than teachers with no experience. Preservice teachers answered slightly more than half of the 11 knowledge items correctly. Elementary preservice teachers correctly answered more knowledge items about ADHD than secondary preservice teachers. No differences in knowledge were identified based on preservice teachers' gender or experience with ADHD. The findings are discussed in relation to other research on teacher attitudes and knowledge for ADHD. Implications for research and practice are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Elementary.; Education, Special.; Education, Teacher Training.; Education, Secondary.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Education and Rehabilitation
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bos, Candace

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleElementary and secondary preservice educators' attitudes and knowledge about attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorderen_US
dc.creatorGrynkewich, Magda Ann Urban, 1952-en_US
dc.contributor.authorGrynkewich, Magda Ann Urban, 1952-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractGeneral education teachers are largely responsible for the education of students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). This is partially due to the educational movement toward inclusion for students with disabilities, and partially due to the ability of about 50% of students with ADHD to progress normally in school when given classroom accommodations and/or instructional modifications. General educators are teaching students with ADHD, yet limited information about teacher attitudes and knowledge about ADHD exists. This study is an initial exploratory investigation that examined the attitudes and knowledge about ADHD of preservice general education teachers at the elementary and secondary levels. Preservice elementary and secondary teachers completed an instrument designed to assess their attitudes and knowledge regarding ADHD. Two scales were created: one scale for items related to attitudes, and the second scale related to basic knowledge about ADHD. Research questions addressed preservice teachers' overall attitude and knowledge about ADHD, and whether grade level, gender, or perceived experience with ADHD influenced their attitude and/or knowledge about ADHD. Findings demonstrated that preservice teachers were in general agreement with positive attitude statements about ADHD. Differences in attitude ratings by grade level were significant, with elementary preservice teachers in stronger agreement with statements about ADHD than secondary preservice teachers. No significant differences in attitude were evident for gender. There was, however, a significant difference in attitude based on teachers' reported experience with ADHD. Teachers with basic or moderate/extensive experience had significantly more positive attitudes than teachers with no experience. Preservice teachers answered slightly more than half of the 11 knowledge items correctly. Elementary preservice teachers correctly answered more knowledge items about ADHD than secondary preservice teachers. No differences in knowledge were identified based on preservice teachers' gender or experience with ADHD. The findings are discussed in relation to other research on teacher attitudes and knowledge for ADHD. Implications for research and practice are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Elementary.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Special.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Teacher Training.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Secondary.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBos, Candaceen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9706174en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34294090en_US
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