Teaching archaeological skills and knowledge to adults with mental retardation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282119
Title:
Teaching archaeological skills and knowledge to adults with mental retardation
Author:
Gittings, James St. Clair, 1948-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study dealt with teaching archaeological skills and knowledge to adults with mental retardation using procedures and techniques of applied behavior analysis. The components of this research consisted of: (a) a descriptive study of archaeological field excavation procedures and activities; (b) an experimental study of three archaeological laboratory tasks that involved washing, counting, and sorting ceramic artifacts; and (c) a survey of opinions of archaeologists concerning the use of adults with mental retardation and other handicapping conditions to assist in archaeological research. Results from the descriptive study demonstrated the ability of three participants to successfully perform all skills required in the field excavation of artifacts, and their accurate identification in retrieval screens. Results from the experimental study of six participants demonstrated successful performance with respect to rigorous and specified criteria for all participants who completed training across all three tasks. In addition this study demonstrated the ability of archaeological personnel to successfully perform the teaching and monitoring procedures of the skills involved in this study. Results form the survey of opinions of three archaeologists provided a positive response to the inclusion of persons with mental retardation into archaeological projects and identified four areas of consideration for future projects in this area.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.; Psychology, Behavioral.; Education, Special.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Education and Rehabilitation
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bijon, Sidney W.; Sales, Amos

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTeaching archaeological skills and knowledge to adults with mental retardationen_US
dc.creatorGittings, James St. Clair, 1948-en_US
dc.contributor.authorGittings, James St. Clair, 1948-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study dealt with teaching archaeological skills and knowledge to adults with mental retardation using procedures and techniques of applied behavior analysis. The components of this research consisted of: (a) a descriptive study of archaeological field excavation procedures and activities; (b) an experimental study of three archaeological laboratory tasks that involved washing, counting, and sorting ceramic artifacts; and (c) a survey of opinions of archaeologists concerning the use of adults with mental retardation and other handicapping conditions to assist in archaeological research. Results from the descriptive study demonstrated the ability of three participants to successfully perform all skills required in the field excavation of artifacts, and their accurate identification in retrieval screens. Results from the experimental study of six participants demonstrated successful performance with respect to rigorous and specified criteria for all participants who completed training across all three tasks. In addition this study demonstrated the ability of archaeological personnel to successfully perform the teaching and monitoring procedures of the skills involved in this study. Results form the survey of opinions of three archaeologists provided a positive response to the inclusion of persons with mental retardation into archaeological projects and identified four areas of consideration for future projects in this area.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Behavioral.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Special.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBijon, Sidney W.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorSales, Amosen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9706154en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34263317en_US
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