Modeling the cost-effectiveness of a regional poison control center using decision analysis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282117
Title:
Modeling the cost-effectiveness of a regional poison control center using decision analysis
Author:
Harrison, Donald Lee, 1956-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Using decision analysis techniques, the cost-effectiveness of two alternatives for treating human poison exposures were modeled. The alternatives were the treatment of poisonings with the services of a regional poison control center versus without access to any poison control center. The relative cost-effectiveness was modeled based on two outcomes (morbidity and mortality) for each of four typical poison exposures: acetaminophen overdose, tricyclic antidepressant overdose, cleaning substance exposure in children, and cough/cold preparation overdose in children. Additionally, analyses were conducted to test the sensitivity of the cost-effectiveness ratio to outcome probability, average inpatient and emergency room charges, and proportion of poison exposures managed on site by the regional poison control center. This research was conducted from society's point of view.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Toxicology.; Engineering, Industrial.; Health Sciences, Pharmacy.; Health Sciences, Public Health.; Health Sciences, Health Care Management.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Pharmaceutical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Draugalis, JoLaine R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleModeling the cost-effectiveness of a regional poison control center using decision analysisen_US
dc.creatorHarrison, Donald Lee, 1956-en_US
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Donald Lee, 1956-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractUsing decision analysis techniques, the cost-effectiveness of two alternatives for treating human poison exposures were modeled. The alternatives were the treatment of poisonings with the services of a regional poison control center versus without access to any poison control center. The relative cost-effectiveness was modeled based on two outcomes (morbidity and mortality) for each of four typical poison exposures: acetaminophen overdose, tricyclic antidepressant overdose, cleaning substance exposure in children, and cough/cold preparation overdose in children. Additionally, analyses were conducted to test the sensitivity of the cost-effectiveness ratio to outcome probability, average inpatient and emergency room charges, and proportion of poison exposures managed on site by the regional poison control center. This research was conducted from society's point of view.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Toxicology.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Industrial.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Pharmacy.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Health Care Management.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePharmaceutical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDraugalis, JoLaine R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9706152en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34263196en_US
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