Academic, linguistic, social and identity development in hard of hearing adolescents educated within an ASL/English Bilingual/Bicultural educational setting for deaf and hard of hearing students

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282113
Title:
Academic, linguistic, social and identity development in hard of hearing adolescents educated within an ASL/English Bilingual/Bicultural educational setting for deaf and hard of hearing students
Author:
Grushkin, Donald Adam, 1965-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Hard-of-hearing individuals currently possess an ambiguous status in the Deaf and Hearing worlds. Neither Hearing nor Deaf themselves, they often exhibit characteristics of both groups. Current educational policy maintains that the public school environment represents the best placement option for hard-of-hearing children. Yet, there is a large body of research which points to academic, linguistic and social difficulties in the mainstream. In addition, there is some evidence that hard-of-hearing individuals often experience confusion in their sense of personal identity in mainstreamed environments, upon recognition that they often cannot fully present themselves as a "Hearing" person, which is what is often expected of them. However, the literature suggests that hard-of-hearing people often gain an enhanced sense of self-identity and esteem upon learning of, meeting, and interacting with Deaf people. The placement of hard-of-hearing children in a school for the deaf, especially one offering an ASL/English Bilingual/Bicultural program, is one possible means of resolving the academic, linguistic, social and identity conflicts of hard-of-hearing individuals. However, this placement option is met with resistance by some who fear that advances in education, speech skills, or identification with Hearing people will be lost. The results of an ethnographic study of four hard-of-hearing adolescents educated within an ASL/English Bilingual/Bicultural program for deaf and hard-of-hearing children are presented. Aspects of the academic achievement, linguistic, social and identity development of these students are introduced and compared to both within-group and previous research findings. Implications of this research are discussed and strategies for further educational and personal growth of these students will be offered.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Bilingual and Multicultural.; Language, Linguistics.; Education, Sociology of.; Education, Educational Psychology.; Education, Special.; Psychology, Developmental.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading and Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ruiz, Richard

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAcademic, linguistic, social and identity development in hard of hearing adolescents educated within an ASL/English Bilingual/Bicultural educational setting for deaf and hard of hearing studentsen_US
dc.creatorGrushkin, Donald Adam, 1965-en_US
dc.contributor.authorGrushkin, Donald Adam, 1965-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHard-of-hearing individuals currently possess an ambiguous status in the Deaf and Hearing worlds. Neither Hearing nor Deaf themselves, they often exhibit characteristics of both groups. Current educational policy maintains that the public school environment represents the best placement option for hard-of-hearing children. Yet, there is a large body of research which points to academic, linguistic and social difficulties in the mainstream. In addition, there is some evidence that hard-of-hearing individuals often experience confusion in their sense of personal identity in mainstreamed environments, upon recognition that they often cannot fully present themselves as a "Hearing" person, which is what is often expected of them. However, the literature suggests that hard-of-hearing people often gain an enhanced sense of self-identity and esteem upon learning of, meeting, and interacting with Deaf people. The placement of hard-of-hearing children in a school for the deaf, especially one offering an ASL/English Bilingual/Bicultural program, is one possible means of resolving the academic, linguistic, social and identity conflicts of hard-of-hearing individuals. However, this placement option is met with resistance by some who fear that advances in education, speech skills, or identification with Hearing people will be lost. The results of an ethnographic study of four hard-of-hearing adolescents educated within an ASL/English Bilingual/Bicultural program for deaf and hard-of-hearing children are presented. Aspects of the academic achievement, linguistic, social and identity development of these students are introduced and compared to both within-group and previous research findings. Implications of this research are discussed and strategies for further educational and personal growth of these students will be offered.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Bilingual and Multicultural.en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Linguistics.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Sociology of.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Special.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRuiz, Richarden_US
dc.identifier.proquest9706150en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34263123en_US
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