Parents' perceptions of raising a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282112
Title:
Parents' perceptions of raising a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
Author:
DuCharme, Sandra
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine parents perceptions regarding four aspects of raising children with ADHD: (a) parent perceptions about their children and the school experience, (b) parent perceptions about their interactions with medical personnel, (c) parent perceptions regarding family and social issues, and (d) parent perceptions regarding their own experiences of raising a child with ADHD. This qualitative study used in-depth phenomenological interviews of seven parents of adolescents from three large metropolitan areas in the Southwest, Midwest, and East. The parameters for selection of participants included parents: (a) of adolescents (12-19) diagnosed with ADHD, (b) who were from different ethnic groups, (c) who demonstrated divergent socioeconomic status, (d) who were from various educational backgrounds, (e) with dissimilar work experiences, (f) who were male or female, and (g) who were from different areas of the country. Each participant had three audiotaped ninety-minute interviews. The transcriptions were analyzed from a thematic perspective and were presented based on the themes that emerged. Findings of parents perceptions were organized into: (a) family and medical issues, (b) parenting issues, and (c) school issues. There were similarities noted between participants and parents of disabled children in general and between participants and other parents of children with ADHD. Family issues included parents perceptions of: (a) the identification process, (b) family interactions, and (c) community interactions. Medical issues included parent perceptions of: (a) medical personnel, and (b) use of medication. Parenting issues included parent views of their: (a) frustrations, (b) feelings, (c) modification to family routines, and (d) fears for their child. Parent strategies included parent views of: (a) the academic strategies they used to help their child, (b) personal strategies they used to help themselves, and (c) attitudinal and cognitive strategies they used to adapt and to be successful in parenting children with ADHD. School issues included parent perceptions of: (a) school placement, transitions, and laws, and (b) their feelings, beliefs, and strategies when dealing with school personnel. Summaries and discussions were included at the end of each section. Conclusions and implications for research and practice were presented in the final chapter.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Behavioral.; Education, Special.; Sociology, Individual and Family Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Education and Rehabilitation
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Antia, Shirin

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleParents' perceptions of raising a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorderen_US
dc.creatorDuCharme, Sandraen_US
dc.contributor.authorDuCharme, Sandraen_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine parents perceptions regarding four aspects of raising children with ADHD: (a) parent perceptions about their children and the school experience, (b) parent perceptions about their interactions with medical personnel, (c) parent perceptions regarding family and social issues, and (d) parent perceptions regarding their own experiences of raising a child with ADHD. This qualitative study used in-depth phenomenological interviews of seven parents of adolescents from three large metropolitan areas in the Southwest, Midwest, and East. The parameters for selection of participants included parents: (a) of adolescents (12-19) diagnosed with ADHD, (b) who were from different ethnic groups, (c) who demonstrated divergent socioeconomic status, (d) who were from various educational backgrounds, (e) with dissimilar work experiences, (f) who were male or female, and (g) who were from different areas of the country. Each participant had three audiotaped ninety-minute interviews. The transcriptions were analyzed from a thematic perspective and were presented based on the themes that emerged. Findings of parents perceptions were organized into: (a) family and medical issues, (b) parenting issues, and (c) school issues. There were similarities noted between participants and parents of disabled children in general and between participants and other parents of children with ADHD. Family issues included parents perceptions of: (a) the identification process, (b) family interactions, and (c) community interactions. Medical issues included parent perceptions of: (a) medical personnel, and (b) use of medication. Parenting issues included parent views of their: (a) frustrations, (b) feelings, (c) modification to family routines, and (d) fears for their child. Parent strategies included parent views of: (a) the academic strategies they used to help their child, (b) personal strategies they used to help themselves, and (c) attitudinal and cognitive strategies they used to adapt and to be successful in parenting children with ADHD. School issues included parent perceptions of: (a) school placement, transitions, and laws, and (b) their feelings, beliefs, and strategies when dealing with school personnel. Summaries and discussions were included at the end of each section. Conclusions and implications for research and practice were presented in the final chapter.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Behavioral.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Special.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Individual and Family Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAntia, Shirinen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9706149en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34263044en_US
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