Information feedback preferences of college students enrolled in piano class

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282110
Title:
Information feedback preferences of college students enrolled in piano class
Author:
Whittaker, Sue McGhee, 1942-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was twofold: to develop a computer-based piano performance trainer, and to study subjects' frequency of choices pertaining to different kinds of information feedback during self-directed practice while using a computer-based trainer. Additional concerns in the present study were: (1) the preferences of subjects regarding other practice options; (2) subjects' accuracy of performance, as measured by an investigator-designed test; (3) the relationship between subjects' accuracy of performance and their attributes of musical aptitude, reading ability, sightreading ability, and manual dexterity; and (4) the relationship between subjects' sightreading ability and the other three attributes. Data were collected from thirty-seven volunteers in piano class at Mesa Community College. In a natural setting, subjects practiced a fifteen-measure composition daily until the earlier of two events occurred: (1) students reached criterion level, or (2) two weeks elapsed. Results indicated that during self-directed practice as they were using a computer-based trainer, students most frequently chose: (a) to receive supplementary visual feedback--superimposed errors over the musical score, (b) to practice with a metronome and (c) to practice part of the composition with both hands. Across all subjects, the number of rhythm errors was significantly greater than the number of pitch errors; only two subjects reached criterion level during the two weeks. A correlation coefficent between performance accuracy scores and subject profile scores revealed a significant relationship between performance accuracy and sightreading, and a slight relationship between performance accuracy scores and reading. The findings indicated no significant relationship between performance accuracy and the other three attributes; also, there was no relationship between the same attributes and sightreading. Some of the writer's recommendations regarding future research in computer-based piano instruction were as follows: (1) Use courseware that "recognizes" student errors and makes incisive commentary or remediation as is necessary. (2) Select appropriately graded material for different skill levels. (3) Incorporate different styles of music. (4) Provide subjects with a supplementary IF mode that combines visual and aural feedback simultaneously. (5) Compare the performance accuracy of different groups of subjects with looser or tighter tolerances of the rhythm error for the beginning of each note.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Music.; Education, Technology of.; Education, Curriculum and Instruction.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
D.M.A.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music and Dance
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hedden, Steven

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleInformation feedback preferences of college students enrolled in piano classen_US
dc.creatorWhittaker, Sue McGhee, 1942-en_US
dc.contributor.authorWhittaker, Sue McGhee, 1942-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was twofold: to develop a computer-based piano performance trainer, and to study subjects' frequency of choices pertaining to different kinds of information feedback during self-directed practice while using a computer-based trainer. Additional concerns in the present study were: (1) the preferences of subjects regarding other practice options; (2) subjects' accuracy of performance, as measured by an investigator-designed test; (3) the relationship between subjects' accuracy of performance and their attributes of musical aptitude, reading ability, sightreading ability, and manual dexterity; and (4) the relationship between subjects' sightreading ability and the other three attributes. Data were collected from thirty-seven volunteers in piano class at Mesa Community College. In a natural setting, subjects practiced a fifteen-measure composition daily until the earlier of two events occurred: (1) students reached criterion level, or (2) two weeks elapsed. Results indicated that during self-directed practice as they were using a computer-based trainer, students most frequently chose: (a) to receive supplementary visual feedback--superimposed errors over the musical score, (b) to practice with a metronome and (c) to practice part of the composition with both hands. Across all subjects, the number of rhythm errors was significantly greater than the number of pitch errors; only two subjects reached criterion level during the two weeks. A correlation coefficent between performance accuracy scores and subject profile scores revealed a significant relationship between performance accuracy and sightreading, and a slight relationship between performance accuracy scores and reading. The findings indicated no significant relationship between performance accuracy and the other three attributes; also, there was no relationship between the same attributes and sightreading. Some of the writer's recommendations regarding future research in computer-based piano instruction were as follows: (1) Use courseware that "recognizes" student errors and makes incisive commentary or remediation as is necessary. (2) Select appropriately graded material for different skill levels. (3) Incorporate different styles of music. (4) Provide subjects with a supplementary IF mode that combines visual and aural feedback simultaneously. (5) Compare the performance accuracy of different groups of subjects with looser or tighter tolerances of the rhythm error for the beginning of each note.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Music.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Technology of.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Curriculum and Instruction.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.nameD.M.A.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusic and Danceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHedden, Stevenen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9706146en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34261382en_US
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