INSTITUTIONAL MODELS FOR WATER RESOURCES ADMINISTRATION IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: CASE EXAMPLE, NIGERIA

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282086
Title:
INSTITUTIONAL MODELS FOR WATER RESOURCES ADMINISTRATION IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: CASE EXAMPLE, NIGERIA
Author:
Ajayi, Owolabi
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Assessment of water resources administration in Nigeria reveals gross inadequacies. The present decision-making framework for water resources administration is not expected to contribute much toward national development in the long run. Water institutions which should provide the means for implementing decisions can best be described as non-existent. Evaluation of water institutions found in the United States resulted in the development of three alternative institutional models of water resources administration, any one of which is recommended for adoption by Nigeria depending on the circumstances. Each of these three alternative models is characterized by significant citizen participation at all levels and at all stages of the decision-making process. One of the alternatives organizes water institutions by level of government, where the states are responsible for all aspects of water resources administration, as on the Colorado River Basin. Another alternative organizes water institutions on the basis of regional, basin-wide executive agencies, such as the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). A third alternative adopts a mixed strategy. Certain areas would have TVA-type executive agencies, while other areas would have no TVA-type agency, but the states would then be responsible for all aspects of water resources administration and development. This situation prevails throughout the United States. At the user level, the institutional framework of decision making for water resources administration provided by the special water districts found in the United States is recommended for adoption by Nigeria to fill a vacuum created at the interface of the water resources system and the social system. The choice of an overall institutional model for Nigeria will be determined by the final political map of the country in relation to the identified river basins. These alternative institutional models for water resources administration are also recommended for consideration by other developing countries.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Water resources development -- Nigeria -- Administration.; Water resources development -- Citizen participation.; Water resources development -- Developing countries.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Hydrology and Water Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bradley, Michael D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleINSTITUTIONAL MODELS FOR WATER RESOURCES ADMINISTRATION IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: CASE EXAMPLE, NIGERIAen_US
dc.creatorAjayi, Owolabien_US
dc.contributor.authorAjayi, Owolabien_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAssessment of water resources administration in Nigeria reveals gross inadequacies. The present decision-making framework for water resources administration is not expected to contribute much toward national development in the long run. Water institutions which should provide the means for implementing decisions can best be described as non-existent. Evaluation of water institutions found in the United States resulted in the development of three alternative institutional models of water resources administration, any one of which is recommended for adoption by Nigeria depending on the circumstances. Each of these three alternative models is characterized by significant citizen participation at all levels and at all stages of the decision-making process. One of the alternatives organizes water institutions by level of government, where the states are responsible for all aspects of water resources administration, as on the Colorado River Basin. Another alternative organizes water institutions on the basis of regional, basin-wide executive agencies, such as the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). A third alternative adopts a mixed strategy. Certain areas would have TVA-type executive agencies, while other areas would have no TVA-type agency, but the states would then be responsible for all aspects of water resources administration and development. This situation prevails throughout the United States. At the user level, the institutional framework of decision making for water resources administration provided by the special water districts found in the United States is recommended for adoption by Nigeria to fill a vacuum created at the interface of the water resources system and the social system. The choice of an overall institutional model for Nigeria will be determined by the final political map of the country in relation to the identified river basins. These alternative institutional models for water resources administration are also recommended for consideration by other developing countries.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Nigeria -- Administration.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Citizen participation.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Developing countries.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBradley, Michael D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8309033en_US
dc.identifier.oclc10425760en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b14417649en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b14417625en_US
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