A BEHAVIORAL EVALUATION OF A PRESCHOOL INTERPERSONAL PROBLEM SOLVING PROGRAM

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/282085
Title:
A BEHAVIORAL EVALUATION OF A PRESCHOOL INTERPERSONAL PROBLEM SOLVING PROGRAM
Author:
Wilson, Sharon Rae
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to develop, implement, and evaluate a comprehensive interpersonal problem solving training program with four and five year old children. The goal of the program was to teach children the necessary skills to successfully resolve problems with their peers. The interpersonal problem solving training program consisted of the following core components: language, perception, problem identification, empathy, alternative generation, consequential thinking, and integration. The sample consisted of 46 children, 23 children in the experimental group and 23 children in the control group. Both experimental and control group subjects met for ten weeks (15-20 minutes a day) with trained graduate students. Control group subjects participated in reading story sessions while experimental group subjects participated in the interpersonal problem solving training sessions. Experimental and control group subjects were assessed at pretest and posttest on two measures. The BPIPS (a behavioral assessment of interpersonal problem solving ability) and the BOS (a behavioral observation scale). Analysis of variance of gain scores demonstrated significant differences between experimental group subjects and control group subjects on: (a) ability to generate solutions in interpersonal problem solving situations and (b) frequency of positive verbal and nonverbal interaction with peers. Analysis of variance of gain scores indicated no significant differences between experimental and control groups on: (a) the frequency of positive interactions with adults or (b) the frequency of negative interactions with either peers or adults. Discussion focused on the measured and observed results from training in the interpersonal problem solving program, possible explanations for insignificant differences relative to adult interactions, and program generalizability.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Problem solving in children.; Interpersonal communication in children.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kirk, Sam

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA BEHAVIORAL EVALUATION OF A PRESCHOOL INTERPERSONAL PROBLEM SOLVING PROGRAMen_US
dc.creatorWilson, Sharon Raeen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Sharon Raeen_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to develop, implement, and evaluate a comprehensive interpersonal problem solving training program with four and five year old children. The goal of the program was to teach children the necessary skills to successfully resolve problems with their peers. The interpersonal problem solving training program consisted of the following core components: language, perception, problem identification, empathy, alternative generation, consequential thinking, and integration. The sample consisted of 46 children, 23 children in the experimental group and 23 children in the control group. Both experimental and control group subjects met for ten weeks (15-20 minutes a day) with trained graduate students. Control group subjects participated in reading story sessions while experimental group subjects participated in the interpersonal problem solving training sessions. Experimental and control group subjects were assessed at pretest and posttest on two measures. The BPIPS (a behavioral assessment of interpersonal problem solving ability) and the BOS (a behavioral observation scale). Analysis of variance of gain scores demonstrated significant differences between experimental group subjects and control group subjects on: (a) ability to generate solutions in interpersonal problem solving situations and (b) frequency of positive verbal and nonverbal interaction with peers. Analysis of variance of gain scores indicated no significant differences between experimental and control groups on: (a) the frequency of positive interactions with adults or (b) the frequency of negative interactions with either peers or adults. Discussion focused on the measured and observed results from training in the interpersonal problem solving program, possible explanations for insignificant differences relative to adult interactions, and program generalizability.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectProblem solving in children.en_US
dc.subjectInterpersonal communication in children.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKirk, Samen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8209921en_US
dc.identifier.oclc8623571en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b13878529en_US
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